2016 Songs for the Final.pdf.docx - MH 68 u201cThe...

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MH 68 “The Beatles” Songs for the Final Exam, Spring 2016 Prof. Upton Songs by The Beatles, arranged by album (followed by singles): Help! (1965) Help!- title track for movie soundtrack; written and sung in a overly authorial voice than any of the Beatles had attempted before You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away- really start hearing influence of Bob Dylan through the voice and the playing of acoustic guitar; homage to Bob Dylan’s song “I don’t believe you, She acts like we’ve never met” I’ve Just Seen a Face- has the feverish tempo and acoustic accompaniment of a world class skiffle band; in the solo, the two beat skiffle rhythm flattens into a jazzier pulse Yesterday- combines Paul’s vocal with violins and cello; first time other Beatles don’t sing nor play instruments in a song Rubber Soul (1965) Drive My Car- first of so called “comedy songs” on Rubber Soul; metaphor for sex Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)- traditional sounding narrative ballad with a lilting modal melody; parodies the start of a hundred traditional ballads beginning with “I once had a girl” In My Life- dreamy guitar introduction and surprisingly forceful beat; vocal delivery and instrumental texture influenced by Smokey Robinson’s “The Track of My Tears” Girl- vampish rhythm and minor key harmony vaguely reminiscent of the composer Kurt Weill; audience thought that the inhaling was referencing smoking marijuana Revolver (1966) Eleanor Rigby- sung to accompaniment of an eight piece string ensemble; strings were added by George Martin who was inspired by film music Yellow Submarine- written by Paul with help from John expressly for Ringo to sing; simple song transformed by multitrack technology into a sophisticated sonic pastiche And Your Bird Can Sing- John taunts his anonymous adversary in opening verse; song was inspired by profile of Frank Sinatra in Esquire which said bird was Sinatra’s fav word Tomorrow Never Knows- melody is very chant like reminiscent of meditation; begins with a spectacular entrance of the drone of a sitar Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - screams were actual recordings of screams at Beatle

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