WGS100SyllabusS17.pdf - 1 Introduction to Gender and...

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1 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies WGS 100 - Section 05 Spring 2017 Instructor: Portia Seddon Mondays/Wednesdays 7:00 PM – 8:15 PM TH 505 Office Hours: Wednesdays 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM or by appointment Office: HW 1739 Email: [email protected] Office Phone: 212 772 5284 Course Description This course is a critical introduction to the study of gender and sexuality using cross-cultural, historical, and contemporary perspectives. Beginning with basic questions about sex, gender, and sexuality, we examine these social constructions through the study of movements for the liberation of women and other oppressed groups. Our perspective will emphasize the intersections between the struggle against gender/sexual oppression, the fight against racial oppression, and the class struggle. We will consider a range of theoretical and political understandings of womanhood, feminism, LGBTQI identities, and the body, looking in particular at the social construction of masculinities and femininities, sexualities, and other categories of “difference.” Throughout our inquiry, we will reflect on the ways in which societies function to reproduce systems of domination and oppression, while we discuss theoretical and practical questions surrounding activism and liberation. This class fulfills the Pluralism and Diversity Group C requirement. It is also a prerequisite for Classics in Feminist Thought, which fulfills a GER Stage 3, Group A or B. If you are interested in learning more about the Women and Gender Studies Program, please visit the website: Learning Objectives By the end of this course, students will be able to define intersectionality, essentialism, biological determinism, LGBTQI, nationalism, and imperialism in quizzes, exams, and written assignments. Students will be able to analyze the differences and relationships between sex, gender, and sexuality; materialism and idealism; sexism and sexual oppression; racism and racial oppression; colonialism and imperialism; and feminism, anarchism, Marxism, and other strategies for liberation, and to apply these conceptual frameworks learned in the course in written assignments, exams, and class discussion. Core Concepts Public vs. private space; essentialism; naturalize; gender and sex; intersectionality; lesbian, gay, bisexual; transgender; intersex; queer; ERA; CEDAW; suffrage; feminism; prejudice vs. institutionalized racism Course Requirements Participation 25%
2 Journal 20% Midterm Exam 20% Final Exam/Paper 20% Quizzes (3 at 5% each) 15% Participation: Since this class addresses topics that require intensive reflection – and that will often resonate with us personally – your close engagement with the readings and with your colleagues is a significant aspect of your grade. Attendance will be taken at every class; anything in excess of three absences will reduce your total grade by one-half a letter grade for each absence (and will further reduce

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