MilestoneTwo.docx - RUNNING HEAD SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED...

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RUNNING HEAD: SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES PHE-340-Q3401 Social and Behavioral Health 19EW3Milestone Two: Sexually Transmitted Diseases 1
RUNNING HEAD: SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES The most common sexually transmitted diseases documented in the state of Connecticut are Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and Syphilis. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea are STDs that have similar symptoms and treatment patterns. Gonorrhea is caused by the bacteria called Neisseria Gonorrhoea, it affects the warm and moist part of the body like the eyes, throat, anus, urethra, vagina, and women reproductive tract. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea are passed from one person to another person which makes them contagious diseases. Men may not show any noticeable symptoms for several weeks or they may not develop any symptoms. Women begin to show symptoms a week after the infection is transmitted. Syphilis is also caused by bacteria; it is painless and spreads by contact with a sore on the genitals, anus, rectum, lips or mouth. There are various social, behavioral and cultural factors associated with sexually transmitted diseases. The social factors associated with STDs are low educational level, marital status, peer group influence and social separation. It is estimated that approximately 131 million people are infected with chlamydia, 78 million with gonorrhea and 5.6 million with syphilis. Some behavioral factors associated with STDs are unprotected sex, substance abuse (drugs and alcohol), mental illness, age of first intercourse, trading sex for money, demographic attributes and social isolation. “In addition, the committee summarizes the potential impact of male circumcision, vaginal douching, risky sexual practices, and other factors on the spread of STDs or risk of sequelae.” (Eng, Butler, 1997) A person who is suffering from these diseases may feeldepressed, and be at risk of stigma and abuse. Having one of these diseases may also have a negative effect on personal relations. The cultural factors associated with STDs are community factors, religious views on intercourse, lack of sexual education among certain cultures and prevalence of infection among a community. There are a few biological factors that are also 2

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