aeneid notes - THE AENEID AS A WORK SOPHIE HUR 7TH PERIOD AP LATIN BOOK 1 SUMMARY\/NOTABLE THEMES FACTS Book 1 introduces the main characters and lays

aeneid notes - THE AENEID AS A WORK SOPHIE HUR 7TH PERIOD...

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THE AENEID AS A WORK SOPHIE HUR 7 TH PERIOD AP LATIN
BOOK 1 SUMMARY/NOTABLE THEMES & FACTS Book 1 introduces the main characters and lays out an outline of what will happen throughout the plot. Juno holds a grudge against Trojans since the judgement of Paris, who decided that Venus was the most beautiful goddess. As Aeneas and his men leave Sicily, Juno bribes Ae- olus to sink his ships; however, Neptune interferes. When they land on the Libyan coast, Venus comes in disguise and meets Aeneas and Achates; they enter Carthage in disguise. Venus orders Cupid to shoot a golden arrow at Dido. Virgil starts The Aeneid by invoking the muse, and follows much of Homer’s style of poetry. The epic poem starts off “in medias res,” or in the middle of things. The plot of The Aeneid builds onto and fol- lows that of the Iliad and Odyssey . A notable thing is that Aeneas is represented as a paragon of Roman virtue, but he also has many human flaws; this may reflect Virgil’s view of Augustus, as The Aeneid was sup- posed to be written as a propaganda for the Romans.
IMPORTANT CHARACTERS/SIGNIFICANT & FAMOUS QUOTES Aeneas is the protagonist of the story; he is a Trojan who is destined to found Rome. This will not be done easily, however, be- cause Juno holds a grudge against Trojans after Paris made her mad, and she will do almost anything to keep him from accom- plishing his goal. Achates is a good friend and companion of Aeneas who keeps him company throughout his journey. When Aeneas and his men reach Carthage, Dido —the queen—welcomes them warmly. She becomes more impor- tant later in the plot. The iconic phrase “Arma virumque cano” starts off the epic poem; this translates to “I sing of arms and a man.” In one of the fist lines, Virgil summons a muse to help tell his story by saying “Musa, mihi causas memora. . .”
RELEVANT ARTWORKS REGARDING BOOK 1 Aeneas and Achates on the Libyan Coast , Dossi 1510 Dido Receiving Aeneas and Cupid Disguised as Ascanius, Francesco Solimena, 1720
BOOK 1I SUMMARY/NOTABLE THEMES & FACTS In Book II, Aeneas starts telling his story about how he came to be at Carthage. He explains the circumstances of the Tro- jan war, and how a clever trick—a giant wooden horse filled with soldiers and weaponry—led to Troy’s fall. While Aeneas and his family are escaping, his wife disappears (and presumably dies). Even though Anchises doesn’t want to leave at first, two “signs,” a crack of thun- der and a falling star, convince him to pro- ceed. The signs that Anchises observes is the beginning of the recurring subject of omens and signals in The Aeneid; there are many implied and direct signs throughout the story.

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