Art 152 18 February 2008

Art 152 18 February 2008 - Art 152 18 February 2008...

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Art 152 18 February 2008 Sixteenth Century Art: Spain, The Netherlands, and England Juan Bautista de Toledo and Juan de Herrera, El Escorial, 1563-1584, Madrid, Spain o Philip II inherited the kingdoms from Charles V – most powerful ruler in Europe; control of waters, vast new territories, trading in Netherlands; lost Netherlands, Armada to England; Peak of power for Spain; art collector – Spanish, Netherlands, etc., Italy; integral to design of palace – wanted monastery/palace (direction in father’s will) – construct a place for Spanish kings to be buried, governmental offices, etc. o Structure resembles gridiron – structural, square; reflect patron of monastery (San Lorenzo) – murdered by being fried on a griddle o Plain, severe exterior; little decoration o Roman classical temple front, pediment, columns, two smaller openings that reflect the central; match, all symmetrical o Granite o Last built: church of monastery; columns are flat pilasters – don’t interrupt smooth look of façade of the outside Classical temple front Arched porch entry; deeper than in Italy, Northern Europe (harsh sunlight) Corners: tall, heavy towers that look like fortification towers; rather, bell towers
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2008 for the course ART 152 taught by Professor Bauer during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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Art 152 18 February 2008 - Art 152 18 February 2008...

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