ISS 335 Final Paper - Immigration and the U.S. Economy 1...

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Immigration and the U.S. Economy 1 Economic Affects of Immigration in the United States ISS 335: National Diversity and Change in the United States The Effect of Immigration on the United States Economy
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Immigration and the U.S. Economy 2 With the economy in decline, specifically in Michigan, due to outsourcing and unemployment rates steeply increasing, many people increasingly place blame on the controversial immigration issue. While economists, through extensive research, insist that immigration does not actually take away American jobs, many Americans would rather scapegoat their unemployment on foreigners. The fear of unemployment is simple, if the number of positions on the job market is fixed, and immigrants are seeking jobs in America alongside native workers, there will then be a decrease in jobs available for low skilled Americans. This threat creates tension and competition among workers within the labor market. This rivalry leads Americans to believe that if employment opportunities are decreased, wages will also follow such a pattern. Although many of these insinuations are hard to prove, it is hard to detract attention from the possibilities. This issue has created a lot of controversy within such an opportunistic nation, and has led to vast studies regarding the connections between immigration and the United States’ economy. This research has been in development since the beginning of the Classical Era of Immigration, 1880-1930, with over one hundred and thirty millions immigrants making their way in and out of the United States of America. Many divisive public opinions regarding employment, earnings, government programs and taxes have been formed due to the added stress that the flow of foreigners has posed on the American economy. According to modern economists, the increase in immigration has not affected the labor market for natives’ opportunities, however, with such a struggling labor market, will Americans be able to cope with the unemployment struggles and accept the difficulties associated with current immigration and the low wage labor market?
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Immigration and the U.S. Economy 3 Currently with over thirty-one million immigrants within the United States borders, the largest number in history and approximately one million new immigrant arrivals per year, the market for low skill employment has become a substantial and controversial issue. The foreign born population constitutes roughly 11.5% of the total America population, with internationals arriving from Latin America, 52.5%, Asia, 25.5%, and Europe, 14% (U.S. Census Bureau, Larsen). These people are lured by American economic factors; they are “pulled” by the booming American market and “pushed” out by their own depressed economies abroad (Qin). Equipped with little education and funds, they still come to seek America’s advantages. Their disadvantageous start in a new and foreign environment typically pushes them into the menial labor force, where employment is much easier to come by. Although their motivation in immigrating is to
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ISS 335 Final Paper - Immigration and the U.S. Economy 1...

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