Glossary of Poetic Terms (1) - Glossary of Poetic Terms AlliterationThe repetition of consonant sounds especially at the beginning of words

Glossary of Poetic Terms (1) - Glossary of Poetic Terms...

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Glossary of Poetic Terms Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Example: "Fetched fresh, as I suppose, off some sweet wood." Hopkins, "In the Valley of the Elwy." Assonance The repetition of similar vowel sounds in a sentence or a line of poetry or prose, as in "I rose and told him of my woe." Whitman's "When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer" contains assonantal "I's" in the following lines: "How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, / Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by myself." Ballad A narrative poem written in four-line stanzas , characterized by swift action and narrated in a direct style. The Anonymous medieval ballad, "Barbara Allan," exemplifies the genre. Blank verse A line of poetry or prose in unrhymed iambic pentameter . Shakespeare's sonnets, Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost , and Robert Frost's meditative poems such as "Birches" include many lines of blank verse. Here are the opening blank verse lines of "Birches": When I see birches bend to left and right / Across the lines of straighter darker trees, / I like to think some boy's been swinging them. Closed form A type of form or structure in poetry characterized by regularity and consistency in such elements as rhyme, line length, and metrical pattern . Frost's "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening" provides one of many examples. A single stanza illustrates some of the features of closed form: Whose woods these are I think I know.His house is in the village though.He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up with snow. Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language, as in these lines: "Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright / Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, / Rage, rage against the dying of the light." Convention A customary feature of a literary work, such as the use of a chorus in Greek tragedy, the inclusion of an explicit moral in a fable , or the use of a particular rhyme scheme in a villanelle . Literary conventions are defining features of particular literary genres, such as novel, short story, ballad, sonnet, and play. Couplet A pair of rhymed lines that may or may not constitute a separate

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