Interactive Reading Model - What Teachers Should Know (1).pptx - Interactive Reading Model What Teachers Should Know Presented by Rosie Amstutz Meghan

Interactive Reading Model - What Teachers Should Know (1).pptx

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Interactive Reading Model What Teachers Should Know
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Presented by: Rosie Amstutz Meghan Manning Lori Batts Sara Dunham Elizabeth Scott
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What is the Interactive Reading Model? An Overview
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Definition An interactive reading model is a reading model that recognizes the interaction of bottom-up and top- down processes simultaneously throughout the reading process. adingMode.htm
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What the Researchers Say Emerald Dechant: o The interactive model suggests that the reader constructs meaning by the selective use of information from all sources of meaning (graphemic, phonemic, morphemic, syntax, semantics) without adherence to any one set order. The reader simultaneously uses all levels of processing even though one source of meaning can be primary at a given time. (Dechant, 1991) Kenneth Goodman: o An interactive model is one which uses print as input and has meaning as output. But the reader provides input, too, and the reader, interacting with the text, is selective in using just as little of the cues from text as necessary to construct meaning. (Goodman, K., 1981) David E. Rumelhart: o Reading is at once a perceptual and a cognitive process. It is a process which bridges and blurs these two traditional distinctions. Moreover, a skilled reader must be able to make use of sensory, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic information to accomplish the task. These various sources of information appear to interact in many complex ways during the process of reading (Rumelhart, D. 1985).
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Core Concepts of the Interactive Reading Model It focuses on the belief that what motivates a student to read is important. A reader is more likely to retain knowledge of the material they are reading if they have an interest in what they are reading. A student’s attitude toward reading is important, and a way to help students have a positive attitude toward reading is to allow them to pick topics of reading that interest them. (Ruddell & Unrau, 1994)
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Highly Qualified Teachers What does a teacher of the Interactive Reading Model looks like?
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A teacher of the interactive reading model… Does not ‘teach’ in the sense of transferring knowledge to the pupil; rather, the teacher serves as a mediator to assist the student in becoming consciously aware of knowledge already possessed Engages the student in a collaborative process of inquiry and self improvement Models through action and allows the student to discover answers for himself or herself. (Ruddell & Unrau, 1994, p. 1489)
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Influential teachers… Use clearly formulated instructional strategies that embody focused goals, plans, and monitoring feedback Possess in-depth knowledge of reading, literacy processes and content knowledge; understands how to teach these effectively
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