ENG 210 Analysis #3.docx - Nathaniel Ogden ENG 210...

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Nathaniel Ogden ENG 210 Analysis #3: Film Production Upon watching a film, one does not pay attention to the credit roll that appears at the end. Watching those credits, one can see how many people it takes to actually make a film. The credits lists the crew by departments, as well as the cast, different places, and organizations involved in the filmmaking process. While watching the credits to Ridley Scott’s The Martian (2015) I have realized how many people it really takes to make a film. During the epilogue of The Martian it was easy to count how many people were involved. As I looked closer though, I noticed many of those names were heads of their respective departments. They also moved slow, so it was easy to keep track of how many there were. Although, after the epilogue, that is when things speed up. The credits of any film moves pretty fast and can last as long as it has to. I kept up with the credits as long as I could. I also kept losing track of people and had to start over. Overall, I had to round out how many people there were. Counting all the people I did, I rounded up about 1,443 people, and that is just an estimate. To be honest, I forgot to count all the places and organizations that was listed, so the total is more than what I calculated. I was also unsure to count the songs and music artists because the songs used were made back in the 70s. There are also many other people who were not listed in the credits, such as extras. There were probably thousands of extras used, such as the Times Square scene and the CNSA headquarters. I honestly feel bad for those people that they did not get credited in the film, but it may have been hard for the filmmakers to have all those extras write down their names. Overall, the credits may not seem as important to a regular audience, but using active viewing, one can truly understand how many people it takes to make a film such as The Martian. All the cast and crew members listed in the credits go through the three stages of film production. The first stage of filmmaking is “pre-production.” This stage involves gathering the cast and crew, such as directors, actors, set and costume designers, makeup artists, location scouts, screenwriters, cinematographers, editors, sound designers, composers, camera operators, etc. Once gathered and hired, the cast and crew members help do many tasks, including (but not limited to) finalizing the script, constructing sets, making costumes, designing special effects, scouting locations and planning out the shooting schedule for the movie in great detail. For the The Martian the script is based on the book of the same name written by Andy Weir. The book was a success and got the attention of 20th Century Fox. The directors position was especially hard to fulfill. The company was happy when they got Ridley Scott on board. The casting list
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