CHM 113 Glassware Final Lab 2 .odt - Utilizing Lab...

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Utilizing Lab Glassware Maggie Trias, Caitlin Evangelesta, Nikhil Dholaria, Chloe Beeson Lab TA Darian Thursday 12:30-2:20 pm
Introduction: In response to the experimental process being composed of a vast number of differing variables and conditions, measured quantities obtained through the use of glassware consistently contain uncertainties. As such, both accuracy and precision are utilized to deconstruct quantitative measurements. While the accuracy of a measurement is dependant on how close or accurate such is to an accepted value, the precision of a measurement is based upon the repetition of said values. When performing measurements and recording collective data, significant figures are essential in indicating the precision of a measurement. In the event that an experiment may contain a concentration of a solution that is too strong, through the process of dilution or adding additional measurements of a solvent to a solute, one may decrease the concentration. Additional analysis of the amounts of a sample present within an experiment, may require measurements of the density, mass, and volume of said substance. The density, or compactness of a substance can be calculated by dividing the mass of a substance by the corresponding volume of such. Encompassing a wide variety of quantitative calculations, the goal of this experiment was to determine which types of glassware are more suited than others for obtaining the most accurate, or precise, measurements in specific experimental situations. Procedure/Experimental: Part One: To commence this “experiment,” all glassware that was being tested for accuracy were gathered: one 50 mL beaker, one 10 mL graduated cylinder, one 50 mL buret, and one 10 mL graduated pipette. The graduated pipette was obtained disassembled, thus the first step prior to proceeding with the lab was to put the two parts together. Also, the buret was properly secured to
the buret clamp which was already present at the lab stations (given prior to start of class). In addition to these materials, one 600 mL beaker which acted as a water reserve and waste (as only water was used in this experiment) was obtained; approximately 300 mL of distilled water was put into this beaker. The presence of a thermometer was also noted as taking temperature readings was necessary for the latter part of the experiment: the results. The thermometer was placed and left in the 600 mL beaker throughout the experiment to record the temperature of the distilled water. Lastly, a funnel was obtained to make it easier to pour water into the buret. After all of the materials had been gathered, the measurements of volume for each type of glassware was determined. For the first trial, 20 mL was decided for the beaker, 5 mL was decided for the graduated cylinder, 5 mL was decided for the graduated pipette, and 20 mL was decided for the buret. These measurements for volume were then recorded in a data table (shown below). Before water was filled and approximated to each measurement predetermined for each glassware, the mass of the

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