BERA ETHICS GUIDANCE NOTES.pdf - REVISED ETHICAL GUIDELINES...

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R EVISED E THICAL G UIDELINES FOR E DUCATIONAL R ESEARCH (2004)
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R EVISED E THICAL G UIDELINES FOR E DUCATIONAL R ESEARCH (2004) 2 R EVISED E THICAL G UIDELINES FOR E DUCATIONAL R ESEARCH (2004) April 2004 Dear Member On behalf of the Council of the British Education Research Association, I am very pleased to present the Association’s Revised Ethical Guidelines for Educational Research to you. As you know we have been engaged in a comprehensive updating of our original 1992 guidelines. We have done this partly to take account of changes in the legislation but mainly to recognize the diversity of our members’ research and the ethical concerns we all share about the relationships between our work and those who participate in it, those who commission it and those who look to it for new knowledge, understanding and practical support. You may wonder why we have kept the word ‘Revised’ in the Guidelines. We have decided to do this firstly for reference purposes to distinguish between them and the original 1992 set and secondly to recognize that these too are not cut in stone. As time goes on, the Council will review and continuously update the Guidelines to ensure that, as circumstances change, we provide the most up-to-date support for our members. I hope that you will find the Guidelines of assistance to you in your work and that you will commend them to everyone who carries out, participates in or makes use of educational research. With best wishes John Furlong (President)
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BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION 3 Historical Note The provenance of these guidelines can be traced back to a BERA invitational seminar convened by John Elliott and held at Homerton College, Cambridge in March, 1988. The seminar led to a report published in Research Intelligence 31 (Feb, 1989), which called for a code of practice to be drawn up. In 1991, BERA council invited Caroline Gipps and Helen Simons to formulate a set of guidelines, drawing with permission on the Elliott report and the then recently published American Educational Research Association’s ethical guidelines. They drew up guidelines, published in Research Intelligence 43 (Summer 1992), for members to comment upon and were formally adopted as the ‘BERA Ethical Guidelines’ at the Association’s Annual General Meeting in August 1992. As a code of practice the guidelines were universally welcomed but also attracted a degree of criticism in relation to their scope and application. An example of this was the critique presented by Peter Foster at the 1996 BERA conference. Following Peter Foster’s death in 1999, his paper was reproduced in Research Intelligence 67 as a tribute to his work. Michael Bassey, the then Academic Secretary of BERA, used the paper to promote debate in the BERA Council and at the beginning of her presidency in September 2001, Anne Edwards announced her intention to update the 1992 Guidelines.
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