ILS Paper May 1st - Pier 1 Dan Pier Professor Avramenko ILS...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dan Pier Professor Avramenko ILS 206 May 1, 2007 Views of “State of Nature” Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau are arguably two of the greatest thinkers of our time. While they may both hold that status, that doesn’t mean that their thoughts and philosophies always share common ground. In fact, the two philosophers’ thoughts often diverge on many topics, most notably, the view of man’s “state of nature”. In Hobbes’ Leviathan and Rousseau’s The First and Second Discourses , both of these men share their thoughts on the natural state of mankind, display why they engage in these thought processes by concluding what the problem is with the current state of things and how it should be fixed, and give us ample divergent thinking and philosophizing allowing us to conclude which of the two views of the “state of nature” is the view that correctly identifies reality. Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau have differing views on the natural state of man, yet they both contain ideas that are equally riveting. Hobbes view on the natural state that man lives in is by far the more pessimistic view of the two thinkers. Hobbes states that the situation in which natural man lives in spawns “continual fear, and danger of violent death” (Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan , 186). In other words, there is no peace in the minds of those living in their natural states. Letting one’s guard down is not only a bad decision, but in most cases, a fatal one. Rousseau contrasts this idea by laying out what he makes of the natural state of man. He states that natural man’s “desires do not exceed his physical needs” Pier 1
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The First and Second Discourses , 116). He also claims that his soul is “agitated by nothing” (Rousseau, 117) and “given over to the sole sentiment of its present existence without any idea of the future” (117). This is far different than Hobbes’ “fight or flight” mentality that he attributes to his natural man. Rousseau’s being is quite content. He lives in a state of frugality. Both sets of characteristics used to describe each thinker’s natural man help to show what kind of life each being lives. The way that Hobbes’
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern