Nut. 2 - Proteins and Amino acids 2/19/2008 10:26:00 AM...

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Proteins and Amino acids 19/02/2008 09:26:00 Protein facts Proteins contain Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins Some amino acids are essential Functions of protein Enzymes- catalysts of chemical reaction o Makes it faster and smoother by connecting two or more chemicals  together Peptide hormones- hormone or substances that are relapsed by some part of  the body that have a reaction in another part Structural protein- muscle, skin, hair Transport protein- lipo proteins- transfer fats Immune-proteins bind to foreign body that come into our body and inactivate  them ex: white blood cells  Amino acids Proteins are chains of amino acids Backbone o Amine group (contains nitrogen) o Acid group Side chain  o 20 major amino acids o Difference between amino acid isn’t the backbone it is the side chain  they all differ.
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Proteins differ on: o Sequence o Shape- function depends on  o Affinity of water o Composition  Some have vitamins and minerals attached o Body may have as many as 10,000 proteins different o Electrical charge o Dipeptide- 2 amino acids o Tro-petide 3 amino acids o Beyond 3 peptides are just proteins Amino acids bonded by peptide bonds form a string Each protein has its own sequence and can have as many as  300 Sequence is determined by genetics Sequence also determines shape Shape determines function in the body The DNA serves as a template to make strand of messenger RNA each  mRNA strand copies exactly the instructions for making some protein cells  o GET FULL STEPS IN BOOK>> The mRNA attaches itself to the protein making machinery of  the cell the ribosome’s As amiino acids are lined up in the right sequence and the  ribosome moves alone the messenger an enzyme bonds one  amino acid after another to the growing protein strand  9 essential amino acids
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 11 nonessential amino acids The difference is we absolutely have to have the essential amino acids Essential Histamine Isoleucine Lucien Lysine methionine phenylalanine threonine tryptophan valine non essential alanine arginine asparagines aspartic acid cysteine glutaminc acid glutamine glycine
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proline Serine  Tyrosine Additionally essential amino acid We need to eat it and it becomes essential if we are lacking one of the  essential amino acids Only two places Existing body proteins  Eating  Denaturation  Take a protein and distort its shape, it becomes non functional  Usually what happens is a mass of proteins and it gets opened up
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2008 for the course HNF 150 taught by Professor Thurston during the Spring '07 term at Michigan State University.

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Nut. 2 - Proteins and Amino acids 2/19/2008 10:26:00 AM...

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