Reducing Carbon Footprint in Malaysia.pdf - 1 Running head MALAYSIA\u2019S POLICY ON CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION Policy Analysis Paper Malaysia\u2019s Policy

Reducing Carbon Footprint in Malaysia.pdf - 1 Running head...

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1 Running head: MALAYSIA’S POLICY ON CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION Policy Analysis Paper Malaysia’s Policy on Carbon Footprint Reduction& Globalization Framework Doris R. Witcher International Public Administration (PAD 540) Assignment 5 Strayer University Professor Timothy Smith December 10, 2018
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2 MALAYSIA’S POLICY ON CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTIONPolicy Issue This paper synopsizes Malaysia’s energy policy- relative to electricity - to reduce its carbon footprint while maintaining an adequate supply of electricity for the nation. Carbon footprint, in simple terms, means that measurable amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) can be detected in the environment to generate electricity. An unhealthy level of CO2 in the environment can cause respiratory failure and other serious illnesses in human organs. The World Nuclear Association (WNA, 2018) explains that fossil fuel power plants generate steam that drives large turbines to produce electricity but unfortunately large amounts of CO2 emissions contribute to climate change. As a developing nation, Malaysia’s challenge is to make and enforce public policy that will balance the benefit and the cost of reducing the carbon footprint to protect the health and prosperity of the nation, as well as help to save the earth for future generations (Shekarchiana, Moghavvemibc, Rismanchia, Mahliaa, & Olofsson, 2012). Background Malaysia’smajor natural resource (non-renewable) is petroleum (i.e. oil and gas) which is being actively exploited. They have coal deposits also but only a small percentage is being mined. Abundant renewable sources of energy in Malaysia are biomass and solar. As with all modern and/or developing nations, Malaysia is faced with a vastly growing population and the production of electricity for domestic and commercial use is causing a harmful carbon footprint in the environment (Raadschelders & Vigoda-Gadot, 2015). This is not a new problem. Since the Industrial Revolution, human sources of carbon dioxide emissions have been growing. Human activities such as the burning of oil, coal and gas, as well as deforestation are the primary causes of the increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere.
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3 MALAYSIA’S POLICY ON CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTIONSpecifically, Malaysia’s number of air-conditioned spaces in buildings where the electricity demand has pointedly intensified over the past ten years, has caused an increase in
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