2-ScientificMethods

2-ScientificMethods - Scientific Methods in Psychology...

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1 Scientific Methods in Psychology Chapter 2 (Part 1) The Scientific Method l The scientific method provides guidelines for scientists in all fields, including psychology, to use in evaluating discrete claims (called hypotheses ) and broader theories. l It is almost impossible to prove with complete certainty that any individual claim or theory is true beyond a doubt. l The scientific method allows us to declare our conclusions to be probable to the point where it is reasonable to treat them as factual. The Scientific Method
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2 Hypotheses l A hypothesis is a testable prediction of what will occur under a stated set of conditions. n Example: There is a relationship between televised violence and aggressive behavior. l Hypotheses can be based on either m Observation (inductive) m Theory (deductive) Research Designs for Testing Hypotheses l Correlational Study : Measure how much time a sample of children watches violent television programs and compare that to how much violent behavior the children exhibit. l Experimental Study : Assign one group of children to watch violent programs and another group to watch nonviolent programs, and then record the differences in amount of violent behavior between the two groups. Operational Definitions
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2-ScientificMethods - Scientific Methods in Psychology...

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