CAS-IR-548.Syllabus.pdf

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BOSTON UNIVERSITY PARDEE SCHOOL OF GLOBAL STUDIES IR 548 Peacekeeping and State-Building Spring 2019 Instructor: Ambassador Vesko Garcevic, [email protected] Office: 152 Bay State Road, Room 446 Office hours: Course Outline This course analyzes the mixed record of "complex" United Nations-led peacekeeping operations as well as other field operations led by the EU and the OSCE since the end of the Cold War. It begins by considering the history of diplomacy with particular reference to the concept of sovereignty and territorial integrity that has been for centuries the cornerstone of relations among internationally recognized states. We’ll briefly discuss the process of states’ recognition in international relations and the two dominant theories that deal with this issue. We’ll then discuss how Covenant of the League of Nations tried to keep the peace after World War I and failed to avert the coming of World War II. We’ll address the concept of collective security embodied both in the Covenant and the United Nations Charter. The course then traces the rise of the concept of "traditional" United Nations peacekeeping based on three principles: first, that the parties had agreed to stop fighting and to involve the United Nations in keeping that peace; second, that the United Nations and its personnel on the ground should be neutral as to the substance of the conflict; and third, that UN peacekeepers would use minimal force in carrying out their mission. Examples of "traditional" peacekeeping operations are briefly considered, and the rise and checkered history of "complex" missions are summarized. The remainder of the course considers in detail the history of post-Cold War peacekeeping missions and the growing number of other state-building field operations. After describing the components of a “complex” of those missions, the course examines each of the key issues national sovereignty v. international responsibility; the new global political commitment - the Responsibility to Protect that is seen by many scholars and diplomats as a cornerstone of a new international system as it doesn’t imply a consent of a state concerned for an intervention to be considered legitimate by international law; attitudes of the parties to the dispute; outside and regional power interest; field missions mandates; “executive - legislative” relations in the United Nations/the EU and other international organizations and so on. Challenges that field missions face, diversity of their mandates and the role of personalities are also considered. Later in the course, the key issues are revisited in the light of a number of ideas and proposals for the reform of peacekeeping operations. In summing up, the class will make a matrix synthesizing what has been learned.
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