The Alcoholic Republic

The Alcoholic Republic - Jeffrey Frankens History 105 The...

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Jeffrey Frankens History 105 -1The Alcoholic Republic In the book “The Alcohol Republic” by W.J. Rorabaugh, the author shows how American Society between 1790 and 1830 drank more alcohol then ever before. It was perfectly assimilated into society, and no matter age, race, or religion you were welcome to have a drink. Even clergymen frequently drank alcohol, which contrasts widely to the majority of Christianity’s stance on alcohol today. W. J. Rorabaugh gives many examples of how American was one of the widest universal drinking countries in the world. Especially from 1790 through 1830, which is why I have to strongly disagree with the statement that “Americans between 1790 and 1830 drank less alcohol per capital than ever before or since.” The first clue is the title of the book: “The Alcoholic Republic.” The book was made to show how different America’s stance was towards alcohol and how much it differed from today. The book’s focus was about how Americans drank so much that between “between 1800 and 1830,” the “annual per capita consumption increased until it exceeded 5 gallons - a rate near triple today’s consumption.” (pg. 8) In the 18 th and 19 th century America’s society was different than it was today. Even when foreigners came to visit America, they were amazed how much the Americans drank, most compared them to the Irish. No matter what age, race, or gender you were you drank some form of alcohol, and most likely a type that has a very high alcohol rating. Masters gave slaves
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The Alcoholic Republic - Jeffrey Frankens History 105 The...

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