Probability Checkpoint 2.docx - MODULE FINDING PROBABILITY OF EVENTS PROBABILITY CHECKPOINT 2 Step 1 of 1 Question 1 of 11 A fair die is rolled 12 times

Probability Checkpoint 2.docx - MODULE FINDING PROBABILITY...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

MODULE FINDING PROBABILITY OF EVENTS PROBABILITY CHECKPOINT 2 Step 1 of 1 Question 1 of 11A fair die is rolled 12 times. Consider the following three possible outcomes:(i)2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2(ii)1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6(iii)4 6 2 1 3 5 2 6 4 3 1 5Which of the following is true?    It is absolutely impossible to get sequence (i).   (ii) is more likely than (i).   (iii) is more likely than (i) or (ii).   The three outcomes are equally likely.   Both (B) and (C) are true.Good job! The die is fair. This means that all faces have an equal probability of occurring on any given roll (1/6). Since each roll is independent of the other rolls, the probability of the each of the three sequences shown is the same, (1/6)12. So the three sequences are equally likely (or we could say equally unlikely  since each has such a small chance of occurring). Question 2 of 11Let A and B be two disjoint events such that P(A) = .20 and P(B) = .60.What is P(A and B)?    0
Image of page 1
Question 3 of 11The following probabilities are based on data collected from U.S. adults duringthe National Health Interview Survey 2005-2007. Individuals are placed into a smoking category based on whether they ever smoked 100 cigarettes (in theirlifetime) and their behavior in the last 30 days.NeverFormerCurrent Non-dailyProbability0.5760.2150.04Based on these data, what is the probability that a randomly selected U.S. adult currently smokes?
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture