Module 1.pptx - HISTORY 100 EARLY WORLD HISTORY MODULE 1 J...

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HISTORY 100 EARLY WORLD HISTORY MODULE 1 J. GONZALEZ-MEEKS ON-LINE LECTURE
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Lecture Outline I. “Becoming Human” a. Early hominids II. Paleolithic Societies a. Hunter-Gatherer communities b. String Revolution III. Agricultural Revolution a. Development of settled agricultural communities and pastoral nomadic communities
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Module 1 Learning Outcomes Describe the characteristic of early hominids Explain the social dynamics of early Hunter- Gatherer communities during the Paleolithic Era Compare the development of early settled agricultural communities to pastoral nomadic communities
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Becoming Human What make us human? In other words, what separates us humans ( homo sapiens ) from other mammals? Brainstorm at least 5 characteristics that make us human. Think about how we developed into the most dominate species on our planet. From living in caves to building skyscrapers.
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Becoming Human Keep those characteristics in mind as we start our journey through world history. For us humans our story begins with the earliest of hominids in Africa. (I should mention that Africa is not a country but a continent with several countries. Much like North America is a continent with 23 counties, which includes our own USA)
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Early Hominids and Adaptation I. Characteristics of Early Hominids Australopithecines - Lucy 3.2 MYA (millions of years ago) - stood three feet tall and semi-bipedal - They were not human but carried the genetic and biological material out of which modern humans would later develop v
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Early Hominids and Adaptation Adaptation - Bipedalism - Freed their arms and hands to perform tasks - Ability to migrate to favorable environment
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Early Hominids and Adaptation Environmental Changes - Ice Age(s) - 15-10 MYA - Adapting to the environment  Moved down from the trees, learned to walk - Opposable thumbs - Larger brains - Cognitive skills  Language Map 1.1 Early Hominids
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Early Hominids and Adaptation Diversity Homo habilis (2.5 MYA) - “Skillful man” - Made tools - Bipedal
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Early Hominids and Adaptation Diversity Homo erectus (1.8 MYA) - “Standing man” - Family dynamic - Use of Fire - Migration
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Diversity Homo erectus (1.8 MYA) - Family dynamic The family dynamic comes from the development of larger brains. As the brain becomes bigger, the child needs to evacuate mommy before the child cannot fit through the birth canal. For our mom’s in class, think about giving a natural birth to a 4 month old. Yikes! Our new born children, they are not fully developed in comparison to other mammal newborns. Hence, the development of the family dynamic. Homo erectus and eventually homo sapiens will need to settle in a favorable environment to raise the child until they walk. Homo Erectus and Family Dynamic
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://wwnorton.com/college/history/worlds-together-concise/ch/01/imaps.aspx
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Early Hominids and Adaptation Diversity Homo sapiens (200,000 years ago) - Cognitive thinking - Language skills - Greater ability to adapt to harsher environments - Hunter and Gatherers The San Hunters and Gatherers of Southern Africa
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Major characteristics that define our hominid branch from the others What makes us human?
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