02.04 Fact Finding .docx - Your topic_The first...

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Unformatted text preview: Your topic:____The first amendment________________________(specific Amendment/personal freedom from Bill of Rights) Fill in the list of resources relating to the topic you selected. Two sources have been provided for you to assist in your research. Explore the provided sources and add sources from your own research. Use your Research Process Notes from this lesson if you need help remembering the research strategies introduced in this lesson. Multi-media Sources: videos, audio, slideshows, or graphics Source 1: Video, (use the video related to the Amendment you chose for your research), “The Story of the Bill of Rights,” Part ____. Source 2: Source 3: . html Domain-Specific Vocabulary/Key Terms: (include definitions or descriptions) 1. Bill of Rights- The first ten amendments in the constitution that protects the liberties of the American people. 2. 1st amendment- An amendment that guarantees the right of press, speech, petition, and assembly. 3. Constitution- Fundamental principles according to a state or organization that is acknowledged to be governed. 4. Freedom- To have a right to act, speak, or think the way you want to without anything restraint. Landmark Case Articles: find articles related to the landmark case you intend to use in your article Source 1:article with list of landmark cases, (choose one case in support of your topic) Tinker v. Des Moines (1969) The court decided that kids wearing black armbands to go against the Vietnam War was symbolic speech that was protected by the 1st amendment. Source 2: Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, 1988 A public school principal took two articles out of the school newspaper because he considered the articles not appropriate. One of the stories was about teenage pregnancy and the other one was about divorce. A couple of students even sued the school saying that their first amendment rights have been violated. Source 3: Morse v. Frederick, 2007 A student from school was suspended due to displaying a banner that promoted the use of drugs at an event in the school. The banner read “BONG HiTS 4 JESUS.” The principal of the school took the banner away and suspended Mr. Frederick. He then sued the school and the principal for violating his rights for the 1st amendment. Domain-Specific Vocabulary/Key Terms: (include definitions or descriptions) 1. Suspended- Prohibit someone from carrying out their usual role for a certain amount of time. 2. Promoted- To further the progress of or actively encourage someone. 3. Rights- A legal privilege to have someone or to act in a specific way. 4. Violated- Failure to respect someone’s rights. 5. Symbolic- involving either the use of symbols or serving as a possible symbol. Contemporary Court Cases: find articles on cases related to your topic Source 1: 44 Liquormart Inc. v. Rhode Island Rhode Island banned the advertisement of retail alcohol prices in places where alcohol isn’t sold. People started to sue saying that their 1st amendment right to freedom of speech was being violated. Source 2: Bethel School District #43 v. Fraser (1987) A student at a public high school was suspended because he delivered a speech that was deemed provocative to the student body. In the speech, the student nominated a classmate to be elected for school office. The Supreme Court claimed that his free speech rights weren’t violated. Source 3: Engel v. Vitale (1962) In the New York school system, every day students started the day with a prayer to God. But this was challenged in Court claiming that the action is an unconstitutional establishment of religion and that it violates the 1st amendment. Domain-Specific Vocabulary/Key Terms: (include definitions or descriptions) 1. Provocative- Causing a strong reaction such as annoyance or anger purposely. 2. Supreme Court- The highest federal court in a country. 3. Unconstitutional- Not in accordance with the constitution or with procedural rules. 4. 5. Advertisement- An announcement in public promoting something, such as an event, service, or items. Nominated- To formally propose someone as a candidate for an award or honor. Advocacy Articles: find articles or documents with statements from presidents, politicians, or advocates abo Source 1: Article 18 states: “Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.” Source 2: The article states: “New guidelines from the Department of Education lower the standards of what constitutes sexual harassment to any “unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature.” Free speech activists say this definition is too broad and could endanger First Amendment rights.” Source 3: The article states: “These days, there seems to be a public opinion poll on every topic, from presidential approval ratings and consumer product use, to knowledge about current events and views of celebrities. However, while polls became ubiquitous in the 20th century, they were not used at all as evidence in court cases until the early 1950s. While polls are now frequently used in court, they are rarely used in defamation cases. In a new article in the NCA journal First Amendment Studies, Eric P. Robinson outlines the history of using public opinion polls as evidence in defamation cases, and argues that the courts should use them more.” Domain-Specific Vocabulary/Key Terms: (include definitions or descriptions) 1. 2. 3. Sexual harassment- Behavior that is inappropriate such as sexual remarks or physical advances that are unwelcome. Manifest- To display a feeling by how someone acts. Department of Education- A department of federal executive branch responsible for helping students out with financial aid for college. 4. Constitute- To be a part of a whole 5. Ubiquitous- Something that feels like it is present and felt everywhere. ...
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