American military history 1 assignment 2 (AutoRecovered).docx

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Question 1 Discuss Nathanael Greene's southern campaign. Why do some historians view Greene as being second only to Washington in importance in winning the war? “Nathanael Greene, one of Washington’s best subordinates, became quartermaster general and miraculously improved the logistical system” (Feis, Maslowski & Millett, 2012, pp. 65). As quartermaster, Greene rose through the ranks of the Continental Army to the rank of General. General Nathanael Greene fought numerous of battles during the revolution with General George Washington such as Battle of Trenton, the Battle of Germantown, and many more battles. During the year of 1780, General George Washington appointed General Horatio Gates to command “a new southern army that was composed of 1,400 Continentals, that was reinforced by militiamen” (Feis et al., 2012, pp. 67). “During the month of August, General Gates proceeded into South Carolina with 1,400 Continentals, where he then met Cornwallis’ advancing army at Camden” (Feis et al., 2012, pp. 67). This Battle at Camden was brutal for the continental southern army, when Cornwallis initiated his attacked, the militiamen cowered, threw down their weapons, and fled. The outnumbered Continentals at first fought valiantly but were overwhelmed. In just three months, two American armies had plummeted into nothing. Upon General Washington’s request General Horatio Gates was relieved of his position and General Greene was appointed to take Grates’ place to command the southern army. Not only did Greene find it quite difficult to command this army after all they have endured before he was appointed into command, but also, he “skillfully coordinated rebel maraudings with the activities of his army, which slowly grew larger and stronger” (Feis et al., 2012, pp. 68). “Greene was especially heartened by the arrival of Daniel Morgan, who had commanded the rifle corps that had fought so well against Burgoyne” (Feis et al., 2012, pp. 68). General Greene was an unconventional strategic leader who would take grave risks that yielded him great dividends. “He assumed command in December 1780 and divided his outnumbered

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