Treatment Agency Brochure.pptx - Second Chance Treatment...

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Unformatted text preview: Second Chance Treatment Services CPSS/405 March 11, 2019 Mary A. Newhams This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Who We Are Second Chance Treatment Services is a community-based treatment center, working in conjunction with local law enforcement and corrections officials by providing treatment services to sex offenders with a moderate to high level risk of reoffending. We help promote public safety by ensuring that clients receive specialized treatment exclusive to each client’s specific needs, no matter how extensive. Treatment options include medication management, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in a group and individualized setting, and other various forms of treatment. We work with local probation offices to ensure that each client is compliant with the offender’s case plan and inform the probation officers of each client’s progression to ensure the offenders are on the right track. This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Risk Levels Accepted There are many sub-groups among the sexual offender population; as well as various threat and offense levels. Although these sub-groups consist of a wide variety of subjects ranging from low risk exhibitionists and non-contact offenders to high risk offenders who commit sexual acts with contact such as rape and child molestation; our program provides treatment (as well as assists in monitoring) services for moderate to high risk sexual offenders once they enter into community corrections. Keeping with the tradition that many offender’s pathology is rooted in some form of cognitive or behavior abnormality, many of these individual’s pose, not only a high risk to other offenders but, a high risk of re-offense if left untreated, unsupported and unmonitored throughout their attempt at reentry (Marshall, 1996., Terry, 2013). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) We take pride in helping everyone retrain their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors through cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that can be used in their everyday life. CBT is offered through an intense group and individual sessions setting allowing each individual to work on improving their way of thinking and behavior (Moster, Wnuk, & Jeglic, 2008). CBT Strengths and Limitations Cognitive-behavioral therapy works with offenders in knowledge and skills on relapse prevention, cognitive restructuring, enhancing empathy, training in interpersonal skills, emotional management, and control of sexual arousal (Terry, 2013). CBT is not for everyone, especially for someone who may have underling mental issues. Although sessions are short the individual must commit to therapy in order to improve. This form of therapy only focus on the individual themselves and does not address wider problems (Moster, Wnuk, & Jeglic, 2008). Pharmacological Treatment Pharmacological treatment uses medical treatment alongside psychiatric treatment to reduce the arousal level and behavior deviancy. The class of medications that used are antidepressants, steroidal antiandrogens, and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (Garcia, Delavenne, Assumpção, & Thibaut, 2013). Below is a list of medications used for treatment. Drugs Used in Treatment Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Fluoxetine Sertraline Androgen Deprivation Therapy Steroidal Antiandrogen Treatment Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA) Cyproterone Acetate (CPA) GnRH Analogs (Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analogs Triptorelin Leuprorelin Goserelin Pharmacological Treatment Strengths and Limitations Through the use of medications along side therapy, offenders have decrease deviant sexual arousal levels as well as behaviors, lower intensity of pathological sexual urges, and improve on self-control (Garcia, Delavenne, Assumpção, & Thibaut, 2013). One limitation of pharmacological treatment is the scope and concentration on single elements of an individual’s deviant behavior (Terry, 2013). Another is there is not a legal time-limit on how long an individual will need to be on the treatment and not all offenders will benefit from pharmacological treatment (Anti-Libidinal Interventions in Sex Offenders: Medical or Correctional, 2017). This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA Impact Treatments on Recidivism We feel that the success of our program’s impact on recidivism is contingent on the effectiveness of our cognitive, behavioral and pharmacological treatment in combination of our success/failure monitoring efficiency in collaboration with and support from law enforcement and correctional support services. Sex offenders experience the same risks and needs as any other offender during the reentry process. Therefore it’s particularly important to enroll them in treatment programs due to the threat levels unique to their population group being so high. The most common treatment programs for sexual offenders are various forms of CBT programs designed to isolate and address the behavioral patterns and thought processes that precede deviant behavior as well as the stressors that trigger the urge to commit criminal acts. The goal is to teach former offenders to recognize these things and to learn how to responsibly process and deal with these events and the thoughts and emotions that come along with them during the reentry process. While program treatment success with sex offenders of different types of offenders, the recidivism rates among their population groups are relatively low after the first three years (approximately 5%), according to the Department of Justice Office and the Office of Justice Programs ( Przybylski, n.d.). This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA The Typical Day A typical day begins with a morning check-in session. Clients meet in groups, based on their needs, and are presented with a question. The question may be as simple as asking what their favorite color is to asking them to describe the impact their actions have had on their lives. After the morning check-in, each client will report to their respective counseling session. Some clients have a one-on-one session in the morning, and a group session in the afternoon. There are clients who work, so they will meet in the morning for the check-in, report to work, and come back for an afternoon group session. We cater to the needs of our clients, so counseling sessions are held at various times throughout the day. We provide medication management services for those clients who have difficulty regulating their medications. Those services start at 8 a.m. and end at 6 p.m., to ensure that each client has a chance to receive their medication, and speak to medical staff should they have questions. Every other week, local probation officers send representation to the facility, and they teach classes such as Thinking for a Change and Victim Impact to further educate our clientele. References Anti-Libidinal Interventions in Sex Offenders: Medical or Correctional. (2017, February 2). Medical Law Review, 24(4), 453-473. doi:10.1093/medlaw/fww003 Garcia, F. D., Delavenne, H. G., Assumpção, A. d., & Thibaut, F. (2013, April 10). Pharmacologic Treatment of Sexual Offenders With Paraphilic Disorder. Current Psychiatric Reports, 15(5), 356. doi:10.1007/s11920-013-0356-5 Moster, A., Wnuk, D.W., & Jeglic, E.L. (2008, April). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Interventions With Sex Offenders. Journal of Correctional Health Care, 14(2). Terry, J. K. (2013). Sexual offenses and offenders: Theory, practice, and policy. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning. Przybylski, R. (n.d.). Office of Justice Programs. Retrieved from ...
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