Jewish 3

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After the Romans removed Jewish people, first from Jerusalem, and then finally from Israel itself, the Jewish people scattered through out the world They remained (and still remain to an extent) scattered for almost the next two thousand years, only coming back in the 19 th and 20 th centuries The modern nation of “Israel” is founded after World War II (1948)
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The Birth of Modern Judaism The Judaism of King David and King Solomon was different from the Judaism of today: (1) The destruction of the Temple in the 1 st century of the Common Era had an enormous impact on Judaism because it had been the center of all Jewish worship and sacrifice. (2) The remaining Jewish people are scattered, affecting their identity as a coherent group Diaspora means “dispersion” or “scattering.”
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Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism survived, but were changed by the events.
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Effects of the dispersion on the Jewish people The scattering among nations and the constant desire to return to Israel and Jerusalem is a key aspect of the history of Jews and their faith. Only certain forms of Judaism survived Rabbinic Judaism (inherited from the Pharisees Christianity
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Christianity The destruction of the Temple forever changed a Jewish movement that had begun with Jesus of Nazareth about 40 years earlier. The movement included Jews and non-Jews who had accepted Jesus as the Jewish Messiah or Christ. Conflict developed between Christian Jews and Rabbinic Jews (Pharisees). The two groups parted ways at the end of the 1 st century. Rabbinic Judaism It was begun by Pharisees. It found a new focus in sacred writings. It encouraged people to gather in synagogues or study houses to study the Torah. Studying and interpreting the Torah became an important way of helping Jewish people follow the laws of the covenant, wherever they lived. Interpreters were known as scribes or rabbis, thus the name Rabbinic Judaism.
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Jews in Christian Europe In the Diaspora, Jews became divided into two major groups: the Ashkenazim in northern, central, and eastern Europe, and the Sephardim around the Mediterranean.
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