HY 104 Syllabus Spring 2019.docx%3FglobalNavigation%3Dfalse (3).docx

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HY 104 – American Civilization Since 1865Spring 2019Tuesday, Thursday, 2-2:50pm, 125 ten Hoor HallProfessor:Dr. Sarah Steinbock-PrattOffice: 214 ten Hoor Hours: Tuesday, Thursday, 12:30-2pm (or by appointment)Phone: 348-1862E-mail: [email protected]Teaching Assistants:Dawn Wiley, [email protected]Charles Thomason, [email protected]Camron Stockford, [email protected]1
Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt WhitmanCourse Description:This introductory class will chart the course of the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the dawn of the twenty-first century. Major themes include migrations to and within the country, economic and political transformations, the rise of the US as a world power, the evolution of the role of the federal government, the contested meaning of American identity, the long struggle for individual and group rights, and definitions and pursuits of freedom. The course strives to understand these changes and conflicts through the perspective of a variety of people’s everyday experiences and concerns. Throughout emphasis is given to cultural and social developments and the relationship between the United States and the wider world.This course also offers an introduction to history as a discipline and as a way of understanding the world in which we live. What does it mean to "think historically" both in class and in everyday life? How can history provide perspective on our lives, our present, and our future? The excerpt from Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” is a good frame for this discussion. The history of the United States contains a dizzying array of contradictory experiences, beliefs, and identities. At times these contradictions are contained within one individual or group trying to resolve conflicting experiences, ideas, and loyalties. The study of history involves embracing these contradictions, examining how they arose and how they continue to shape our culture, politics, and relationship with the rest of the world.Course Objectives: 1.Students will be able to identify key individuals and events in modern American history.2.Students will be able to evaluate historical sources for their utility in historical understanding.3.Students will explain how American society, culture, economics and politics have changed over time, especially during the period after 1865.4.Students will be able to structure and develop historical arguments effectively.5.Students will be able to communicate their ideas about history clearly and persuasively in oral and written formats.Course Requirements:1)Regular class attendance, completion of readings, and thoughtful participation in discussion sections. (10%)2)Primary Source Evaluation, due Jan. 24, in class and online (5%)3)Midterm exam, February 26, in class (25%)4)Book and Document Analysis, due March 26, in class and online (20%)5)Revision of Analysis, due April 16, in class and online (15%)6)Final exam, May 1, 8:00-10:30am (25%)Assigned Readings:
The following books are required reading for the course.

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