Ch. 19 England in the Tudor Age.pdf - Ch 19 England in the...

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Ch. 19 England in the Tudor Age Renaissance London London in 1547 was a port city on the banks of the Thames River. Its 80,000 or so inhabitants constituted only about 4% of the entire English population By 1700, London would house almost half a million ppl - 10% of the country's total population, the result of a construction boom almost unprecedented in the Western world Precipitating the boom was the Dissolution Act of 1536 dissolving the monasteries & selling off Church holdings The Dissolution Act of 1536 Motivated primarily by King Henry's VIII's need for money, but his quarrel w/the Roman Church & his desire to assert authority as the head of the Church of England may have played a part Before the Dissolution, as much as 60% of the property in some parts of London was in ecclesiastical hands People flocked to the city from the countryside - esp. young men intent on making their fortunes Henry VIII In his youth, he was a great athlete & extremely competitive, a passionate musicians who composed popular tunes, and a lover of astronomy and mapmaking Henry's mind was arguably the best of any European ruler of the age The Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, w/whom Henry corresponded in Latin, called him "a universal genius" Throughout his reign, Henry surrounded himself w/humanist scholars who tested his formidable intellect & brought prestige to his court Hans Holbein the Younger, Henry VIII in Wedding Dress Henry, age 49 when this portrait was painted, was six ft 2 inches tall and had an imposing 54" waist Henry is in the clothes he wore when he married Anne of Cleves in 1540. He had 6 wives and ordered the beheading of 2 These marriages produced 3 children: Mary, Elizabeth, and Edward The Tudor Genealogy The house of Tudor was founded in the 15c by Owen Tudor (ca. 1400-61), but the dynasty occupying the throne of England didn't begin until 1485, when Henry VII took the throne Thomas Moore and Utopia By the time Utopia was published in 1516, Thomas More (1478-1535) was Henry's VIII's unofficial secy. In 1529, More was appointed Lord Chancellor, the presiding officer of the House of Lords In Greek, eu means "good" and topos "place," hence "good place," but also the root might be ou meaning "not," hence "no place" - and thus a profound critique of the English political system In 1535, Henry had More executed for suggesting that Henry's 1st wife, Katharine of Aragon's daughter Mary was the legit heir to the throne, not Anne Boleyn's child, Elizabeth
Hans Holbein the Younger, Thomas More

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