Final outline.docx - The Culture behind St Kitts and Nevis Charlene Kabongo Afro\u00adCaribbean 3200 Section 7342 Professor Mark W Payne 1 This fairly new

Final outline.docx - The Culture behind St Kitts and Nevis...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 11 pages.

The Culture behind St. Kitts and Nevis Charlene Kabongo December 03, 2017 Afro-Caribbean 3200 Section 7342 Professor: Mark W. Payne 1
Image of page 1
This fairly new independent State of St. Kitts-Nevis presently stands about the size of Washington D.C with a population of approximately 44,000 with St. Kitts holding 35,000 inhabitants and Nevis with 9,000 inhabitants. It is located in the western portion of the Caribbean, about 120 miles   east   of   the   U.S   Virgin   Islands,   approximately   250 miles southeast of Puerto Rico. Prior to 1967, the Islands consisted of three islands, St. Kitts, known as the seat of government,   Nevis   and   Anguilla.   By   1967   Anguilla   seceded from the British Federation, and St. Kitts and Nevis became one poetically independent island in 1983. It’s been stated that 95% of the populace consist of Afro-Caribbean’s who are largely   descendants   of   slaves   imported   to   work   on   sugar plantations   and   the   remainder   are   merely   descendants   of British settlers and of early and later migrants. St. Kitts and Nevis inhabitants and residents have a dialect partly based   on   English   and   partly   on   Several   West   African languages.   For   the   most   part   English   is   the   language   of business, religion and schools. However the local dialect referred to as Kitttitian on Saint Kitts and Nevisian on Nevis is used in family and at Social gatherings. One can also   see   this   type   of   tradition   in   a   lot   of   African 2
Image of page 2
countries that were colonized by the British or the French. Local dialect or “home languages” are only spoken at home or among   friends,   while   French   or   English   is   used   in   a professional setting. Saint   Kitts   and   Nevis   origins’   is   deeply   held   on Cultural   symbols.   Both   islands   have   traditional   dances, music,   garb   and   tales   but   neither   is   committed   to   a constellation   of   symbols   that   could   anchor   cultural identity.   Rather   the   different   variety   of   culture   is celebrated in a series of festivals. Symbolic features such as   clowns,   Moko-Jumbies   and   other   mythological   figures represent a key part of St. Kitts’ culture. Originating in West Africa, Moko-Jumbies or stilt walkers are a favorite part of the celebration of the culture on St. Kitts. These popular   figures   derive   from   African   mythology   with significance   of   the   god   of   vengeance.   The   masquerade   art form   is   a   combination   of   African   and   European   influences that   have   been   evolving.   In   Heritage   perspective,   a documentary on St. Kitts an islander by the name of Perry
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • Ejueyitchie,Chineldo
  • Saint Kitts, Anguilla

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture