Lecture 6 - Lecture notes for Geosciences...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture notes for Geosciences 040-Arthur/Marone (copyright Pennsylvania State University, 2005) September 15th & 20th Reading: Chapt. 6 in Garrison Note: These notes cover two lectures Also, we will start off on Sept 13th with some leftover material on "physical properties of seawater". See you there! Properties of Sea Water: Why the Sea is Salt Note Rachel Carson's elegant expression of the history of salt in seawater and summary of the processes that operate to make seawater salty--Is this view correct? (come to lecture for the answer) "The primeval ocean... must have been only faintly salt. But the falling rains were the symbol of the dissolution of the continents. From the moment the rains began to fall, the land began to be worn away and carried to the sea. It is an endless, inexorable process that has never stopeed--the dissolving of the rocks, the leaching out of their contained minerals, the carrying of the rock fragments and dissolved minerals to the ocean. And over the eons of time, the sea has grown ever more bitter with the salt of the continents." Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us Water: THE UNIVERSAL SOLVENT The structure of water molecules provides water with the unique ability to act as a very effective solvent (to be able to "hold" various chemical ions in solution-dissolved compounds) WHY THE SEA IS SALT Note Rachel Carson's elegant expression of the history of salt in seawater...
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course GEOSC 040 taught by Professor Arthur during the Fall '08 term at Penn State.

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Lecture 6 - Lecture notes for Geosciences...

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