tips for lit analysis (2).doc - Literary Analysis...

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Contemporary Project Management
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Chapter 5 / Exercise 10
Contemporary Project Management
Kloppenborg
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Literary Analysis Paper/Rubric What is a literary analysis? In a literary analysis, you write a formal paper in which you make an argument and support your argument with examples from and analysis of a literary text. What is the point? You should be developing your abilities to READ a text, make an ARGUMENT, LOGICALLY support that argument with evidence from the text, write in an ORGANIZED manner which will aid in conveying your points to the reader, and communicate via the written page. What a literary analysis IS NOT ! A paper exploring the relevance of the story to your own life. While your own experience will of course shape your writing style as well as the story you pick, you should not focus on personal life experiences or use them as arguments for your topic. A summary of the text. A summary of the class notes. Steps you should take: 1. Formulate a clear thesis. 2. Formulate a few questions relevant to your thesis which will help you when you reread the text. 3. Reread the text you want to address carefully. Underline passages which are relevant or copy them into your notes. Try to answer the questions you’ve formulated. 4. Brainstorm ideas: what arguments can you make? What connections come to mind? 5. Reexamine your thesis. Is it supportable? Is it complex enough? Is it interesting? 6. Organize your examples and your ideas. Make a rough outline, including examples and page numbers. 7. Write! 8. Ask yourself: Do my sentences connect? Do my paragraphs connect? (In other words, does this make any sense at all?) 9. Rewrite! 10. Have someone else proof read it. 11. Rewrite! 12. Submit your final draft on Brightspace. Tips for Writing a Literary Analysis 1. Write in the present tense. EXAMPLE: In Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily," the townspeople visit Emily Grierson's house because it smells bad. NOT: In Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily," the townspeople visited Emily Grierson's house because it smelled bad. 2. Normally, keep yourself out of your analysis; in other words, use the third person (no I or you ).
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Contemporary Project Management
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Chapter 5 / Exercise 10
Contemporary Project Management
Kloppenborg
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