The Kite Runner Dialectical Journal - Shona Heywood AP Literature 10 November 2016 The Kite Runner Dialectical Journal Reference to the Text

The Kite Runner Dialectical Journal - Shona Heywood AP...

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Shona Heywood AP Literature 10 November 2016 The Kite Runner Dialectical Journal Reference to the TextResponse #Response to Text Examples 1. “But Baba sensed my lack of genuine interest and resigned himself to the bleak fact that his son was never going to either play or watch soccer.” (20) 1 I related to this feeling of athletic disappointment Amir felt, because my parents feel similarly towards me. As my dad was a phenomenal swimmer, and my mother a great runner, they feel disappointed in me for not feeling the same way they did about athletic endeavors. 2. “...I never thought of Hassan and me as friends either… In the end, I was a Pashtun and he was a Hazara… and nothing was ever going to change that.” (25) 10 Social classes played a huge role in the plot. This quote especially works to show that no matter how close a relationship or bond was between slave and master, at the end of the day, social class cannot be breached. 3. “‘Please leave us alone, Agha,’ Hassan said in a flat tone. He’d referred to Assef as ‘Agha’, and I wondered briefly what it must be like to live with such an ingrained sense of one’s place in a hierarchy.” (42) 11 For me, a question was raised, and then quickly answered. I was confused as to why Hassan was still referring to Assef as “Agha”, a known term of respect, considering the circumstances. The point of view of Amir is used to provide insight as to why this is, and explains not only that Hassan has had the role between slave and upper class beaten into him (so to speak), but that Amir will never have any understanding of what this is like. 4. “‘I grew up with Ali,’ he said through clenched teeth. ‘My father took him in, he loved Ali like his own son. Forty years Ali’s been with my family. Forty goddamn years. And you think I’m just going to throw him out?’... ‘You bring me shame.” (89-90) 8 Judging by Baba’s belligerent response to Amir’s question, readers may assume that the relationship between Ali and Baba means more to Baba than he lets on. Later in the story, readers find out that Hassan and Amir are actually half brothers, with Baba as
their unifying DNA. This explains why Baba’s response to Amir’s question was so aggressive. 5. “Baba never said so, but I knew he saw my car sickness as yet another array of weakness - I saw it on his embarrassed face…” (110) 9 Baba’s continuous disappointment in Amir serves as a motif throughout the book. Amir is aware of things that subconsciously make Baba ashamed of him, like this. Amir lives his whole childhood and first section of adulthood aiming to make Baba proud. This quest for pride was catalytic in his non-prevention of Assef raping Hassan, because he wanted to bring the kite

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