COMPARE AND CONTRAST METHODS OF TEACHING MUSIC BY ANY 3 MUSIC EDUCATORS.docx

COMPARE AND CONTRAST METHODS OF TEACHING MUSIC BY ANY 3 MUSIC EDUCATORS.docx

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INTRODUCTION Music education is a field of study associated with the teaching and learning of music . It touches on all domains of learning, including the psychomotor domain (the development of skills), the cognitive domain (the acquisition of knowledge), and, in particular and significant ways, the affective domain, including music appreciation and sensitivity. The incorporation of music training from preschool to postsecondary education is common in most nations because involvement in music is considered a fundamental component of human culture and behaviour . Music, like language, is an accomplishment that distinguishes us as humans The study of Western art music is increasingly common in music education outside of North America and Europe, including Asian nations such as South Korea, Japan, and China. At the same time, Western universities and colleges are widening their curriculum to include music of outside the Western art music canon, including music of West Africa , of Indonesia (e.g. Gamelan music ), Mexico ( e.g., mariachi music , Zimbabwe ( marimba music ), as well as popular music. Music education also takes place in individualized, lifelong learning, and community contexts. Both amateur and professional musicians typically take music lessons , short private sessions with an individual teacher. Amateur musicians typically take lessons to learn musical rudiments and beginner- to intermediate-level musical techniques. While instructional strategies are bound by the music teacher and the music curriculum in his or her area, many teachers rely heavily on one of many instructional methodologies that emerged in recent generations and developed rapidly during the latter half of the 20th Century
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ZOLTAN KODALY Kodály became interested in the music education of children in 1925 when he overheard some students singing songs that they had learned at school. Kodály was appalled by the standard of the children's singing, and was inspired to do something to improve the music education system in Hungary. He wrote a number of controversial articles, columns, and essays to raise awareness about the issue of music education. In his writings, Kodály criticized schools for using poor-quality music and for only teaching music in the secondary grades. Kodály insisted that the music education system needed better teachers, better curriculum , and more class time devoted to music. Zoltán Kodály (1882–1967) was a prominent Hungarian music educator and composer who stressed the benefits of physical instruction and response to music. Although not really an educational method, his teachings reside within a fun, educational framework built on a solid grasp of basic music theory and music notation in various verbal and written forms. Kodaly’s primary goal was to instil a lifelong love of music in his students and felt that it was the duty of the child's school to provide this vital element of education. Some of Kodaly’s trademark teaching methods include the use of solfège hand signs, musical shorthand
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