Unit_4 - Key Concepts and Facts People have the right to...

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Unformatted text preview: Key Concepts and Facts People have the right to know what is in the food they buy Labels give information so people can make informed decisions Labeling regulations cover the type of foods that must be labeled and set standards for the content and format of labels Labeling is Relatively New 1990: Nutrition Labeling and Education Act was passed 1993: Nutrition Labeling and Education Act rules were finalized and published 1993 present: Rules on labeling and implementation revisions are ongoing. For instance, 60% of supermarkets must now provide nutrition information available in the form of posters, cards or pamphlets located near fresh produce, meat and seafood. What Foods Must be Labeled? Foods containing more than one ingredient (mostly processed foods) Dietary supplements If a claim is made - low fat, low calorie, etc. - makers (and restaurants) must display nutrition information backing the the claim Foods that arent required to be labeled: Fresh produce (fruits and vegetables) Fresh meat and seafood Bite-size candy (kisses, peppermints, etc.) Foods sold by small businesses (bakeries, restaurants, food stands) Exemption is lost if they make a health claim or list a nutrient on the label Restaurant Food Nutrient Composition Fast food restaurants typically supply composition at their web sites On site information is rarely complete inside restaurants Information for the healthiest items is available in about two thirds of major chain table-service restaurants The Nutrition Facts Label What's on the Nutrition Label? What is Required on a Label? Daily Values (DVs) Standard Levels of dietary intake of nutrients developed specifically for nutrition labeling. Table 4.1 What is Required on a Label? Trans fat became required on Nutrition Facts panels in 2003 Food companies had until January 1, 2006 to implement this requirement Trans fats are found primarily in shortenings, margarines, frying oils used in fast food restaurants, and bakery goods High intake of trans fat is related to the development of heart disease and consumers are being urged to consume as little of it as possible Content of these nutrients is based on standard serving size defined by FDA Standard serving sizes are established for 131 types of food Health Claims Nutrition Claims...
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course NUTR 100 taught by Professor Martinrosel during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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Unit_4 - Key Concepts and Facts People have the right to...

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