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Unit_6 - Key Concepts and Facts Healthy diets are...

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Key Concepts and Facts Healthy diets are characterized by adequacy and balance There are many types of healthy diets There are no good or bad foods, only diets that are healthy or unhealthy The “Dietary Guidelines for Americans” and the “Food Guide Pyramid” provide foundation information for healthy diets
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Healthful Diets Are adequate Are balanced
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Adequate Diets Variety of foods provide sufficient levels of calories and essential nutrients Calories must maintain healthy body weight Essential nutrients at levels from the RDAs and AIs Following MyPyramid ensures need for essential nutrients and other beneficial components will be met
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Balanced Diets Provide calories, nutrients, and other components in the right proportions Too much or too little nutrients or calories are out of balance
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Macronutrient Intake Guidelines to balance intake of fat, carbohydrate and protein AMDR or “Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges” guidelines indicate percentages of total caloric intake from carbohydrate, protein, and fat for individuals over the age of 4 years
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Macronutrient Intake Prevention of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, and dietary adequacy are related to various levels of intakes, not one specific intake level Recommendations for the percent of total calories from unsaturated and saturated fats have been removed from the new standards Now it is recommended that diets be kept low in saturated fat Sufficient amounts of essential unsaturated fatty acids are needed
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Over-consumption of Added Sugar and Saturated Fat U.S. diet overloaded with added sugars fat salt Low in essential fatty acids dairy products vegetables and fruits fiber High intakes of fat and saturated fat and trans fat are risks for heart disease Low intake of dairy products and vitamin D are risks for osteoporosis
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