APMacro_syllabus - Macroeconomics Advanced Placement This is a one-semester college level course Each unit will culminate in one test with tests

APMacro_syllabus - Macroeconomics Advanced Placement...

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Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement This is a one-semester college level course. Each unit will culminate in one test, with tests weighing 50% of the student’s final grade in the course. Daily grades will count for 20%, quizzes 25%, and participation the remaining 5%. Resources: - Text Krugman’s Economics for AP, second edition - Supplement: Advanced Placement Economics, 4th ed - News sources such as The Economist magazine, CNN.com, etc. - Historical writings by economists Teaching Strategies: As a teacher I plan to facilitate the students learning by using as many different learning strategies as possible. In class I will utilize the activities from John Morton’s materials (lab eled as ACT in the calendar), as well as simulations from NCEE materials and Economics for Educators. Students will practice graphing frequently, both in tests and on white boards during lectures, and will also make short presentations over material (including graphs) in class. Outside of the classroom I will encourage the students to use a variety of internet sources for practice. In order to keep the students focused on preparing for class, I will give short reading quizzes and regular length quizzes. After each test the students have time to review the test. Each unit will also have at least one timed writing to help the students prepare for the free response portion of the AP exam. Course Syllabus: Unit 1 Modules 1-7 AP Syllabus Learning Plan Active reading strategies Working on economic thinking Comparative advantage simulation Market price simulation Graphing practice activity Writing practice for FRQ skill development Topics to Cover Unit 1: An Introduction to Economics Topic I: Basic Economic Concepts A. Scarcity: What is it? Why is it so important to economic thought? B. Opportunity Cost: Define and compute it. Why can it never be avoided? C. Production Possibilities: Construct and interpret production possibilities, schedules, and graphs; relate production possibilities curves to the issues of scarcity, choice, and cost. Why are most PPCs bowed out? D. Specialization and Comparative Advantage: Define and calculate absolute and comparative advantages for production exchange. E. Functions of Any Economic System 1. Answer the questions: What to produce? How to produce? For whom to produce? 2. Define ways societies determine allocation, efficiency, and equity. Topic II: Demand, Supply, and Price Determination A. Demand: Define and illustrate demand through schedules and graphs. 1. Distinguish between changes in quantity demanded and changes in demand.

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