\u3010\u6559\u5b66\u4ea7\u54c1\u4e2d\u5fc3\u3011SAT\u9636\u6bb5\u6d4b\u8bd5_Test 4.docx - \u3010\u6559\u5b66\u4ea7\u54c1\u4e2d\u5fc3\u3011 SAT \u9636\u6bb5\u6d4b\u8bd5 4 Test 4 Reading Test 65 MINUTES 52 QUESTIONS Turn to

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【教学产品中心】SAT阶段测试4Test 4Reading Test65 MINUTES, 52 QUESTIONSTurn to Section 1 of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section.__________________________________________________________________________________DIRECTIONSEach passage or pair of passages below is followed by a number of questions. After readingeach passage or pair, choose the best answer to each question based on what is stated or implied in the passage or passages and in any accompanying graphics (such as a table or graph).______________________________________________________________________________________
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Line51015202530354045Questions 1-10 are based on the following passage.E.M. Forster - A Room With a View (novel published 1908)A few days after the engagement was announced Mrs. Honeychurch made Lucy and her Fiasco come to a little garden-party in the neighbourhood, for naturally she wanted to show people that her daughter was marrying a presentableman.Cecil was more than presentable; he looked distinguished, and it was very pleasant to see his slim figure keeping step with Lucy, and his long, fair face responding when Lucy spoke to him. People congratulated Mrs. Honcychurch, which is, I believe, a social blunder, but it pleased her, and she introduced Cecil rather indiscriminately to some stuffy dowagers.At tea a misfortune took place: a cup of coffee was upset over Lucy’s figured silkand though Lucy feigned indifference, her mother feigned nothing of the sort but dragged her indoors to have the frock treated by a sympathetic maid. They were gone some time, and Cecil was left with the dowagers. When they returned he was not as pleasant as he had been.“Do you go to much of this sort of thing?” he asked when they were driving home.“Oh, now and then,” said Lucy, who had rather enjoyed herself.“Is it typical of country society?”“I suppose so. Mother, would it be?”“Plenty of society,” said Mrs. Honeychurch, who was trying to remember the hang of one of the dresses.Seeing that her thoughts were elsewhere, Cecil bent towards Lucy and said:“To me it seemed perfectly appalling, disastrous, portentous.”“I am so sorry that you were stranded”“Not that, but the congratulations. It is so disgusting, the way an engagement is regarded as public property—a kind ofwaste place where every outsider may shoot his vulgar sentiment. All those old women smirking!”“One has to go through it, I suppose. They won't notice us so much next time.”“But my point is that their whole attitude is wrong. An engagement—horrid word in the first place—is a private matter, and should be treated as such.”Yet the smirking old women, however wrong individually, were racially correct. The spirit of the generations had smiled through them, rejoicing in the engagement of Cecil and Lucy because it promised the continuance of life on earth. To Cecil and Lucy it promised
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50556065707580something quite different—personal love. Hence Cecil’s irritation and Lucy's belief that his irritation was just.
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