5.docx - Chapter 5 Socialization Social Experience The Key...

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Chapter 5 SocializationSocial Experience: The Key to Our Humanity-Socializationis the lifelong social experience by which people develop their human potential to learn cultureoPrimary = occurs during childhoodoSecondary = later in life -Humans need social experience to learn their culture and to survive -Also, social experience is foundation of personalitya person’s fairly consistent patterns of acting, thinking and feeling Human Development: Nature and Nurture-Centuries ago, people mistakenly believed that human born instincts determined their personality and behavior-Charles Darwin study of evolution led people to believe human behavior was instinctive, simply our nature(ex. born criminals, women are naturally emotional, etc.) – everything was blamed on biology-John B. Watson developed theory in 20thcentury of behaviorismwhich holds that behavior is not instinctive but learned, thus human behavior is rooted in nurture -Without denying the importance of nature, then, we can correctly say that nurture matters more in shaping human behavior. More precisely, nurture is our nature Social Isolation-Research with monkeys proved those in isolation were more passive, anxious and fearfulonce placed with a group-Closeness benefits the monkey’s development – an infant with 3 months isolation could recover but 6 months had serious emotional and behavioral damage -Three cases of human instances oAnna: the rest of the story – she slowly learned how to walk but could not talk until she was 10, and her mental development at 8 was of a 2 year old. She died at 10 due to blood disorder probably related to years of abuse she sufferedoOther two examples of impact on mental development and ability to surviveUnderstanding Socialization Theory 1: Sigmund Freud Elements of Personality-Freud claimed that biology plays a major part in human development, although not in terms of specific instincts -Rather, he theorized that humans have two basic needs or drives that are present at birth oSexual and emotional bonding – called “life instinct” or eros (from Greek world of love)oAggressive drive – called “death instinct or thanatos (greek work death) oThese opposing forces operate at unconscious level, create deep inner tensions -Freud combined basic needs and the influence of society into a model of personality with three parts: id, ego, and superego oId(Latin for “it”) represents the human’s basic drives, which are unconscious and demand immediate satisfaction. Rooted in biology, presents at birth making
newborn a bundle of demands for attention/touch/food oEgo(Latin word for “I”) which is a person’s conscious efforts to balance innate pleasure-seeking drives with the demands of society. The ego develops as we become aware of ourselves and at the same time realize that we cannot have everything we want.

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