Fact or Fiction

Fact or Fiction - 1 Patrick Angle English 101 9-6-07 Fact...

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1 Patrick Angle English 101 9-6-07 Fact or Fiction: Distinguishing Articles by Their Content, Not Their Covers There are many types of writing in our society today, from the beloved articles on Wikipedia, to compositions like Dietetic Practice Studies. With all of the resources available to us, how would one know which articles to trust? Thus we take our journey to discover the fine lines between “research-based” texts and the everyday informative “popular” article. To begin the search, we start by looking at two different types of articles covering similar material, with the main focus relying solely upon the audience. The popular article is titled with the colorful phrase, “A Donut for Your Diet? The Truth about Trans Fat,” which was written for ABC News by Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, a qualified dietician. The academically based article has a more direct title which generally includes what the article discusses, “Fatty Acid Intake and Serum Lipids in Overweight and Obese Adults.” Not only is the article’s title more professional sounding, but it’s also written by six scientists, composed of Randi Belhumeur, MS, RD, LDN; Geoffrey W. Greene, PhD, RD, LDN; Deborah Riebe, PhD; Marjorie Caldwell, Phd, RD, LDN; Laurie Ruggiero, PhD; and Kira Stillwell, MS. This undeniably educated team is one prime example of the solidity of the article. Thus we seek a common ground shared among all scientific papers, which includes three main disciplines writing, which consist of Language, Structure, and Reference. First off comes the language, as it is the most obvious and noticeable section. At the very beginning of “Fatty Acid Intake and Serum Lipids in Overweight and Obese Adults,” the title describes what the entire body is going to be about. Without playing around, the authors jump right in and leave no cushion room, as they are writing for the sole purpose of research and
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2 Patrick Angle English 101 9-6-07 credibility. With key words in the title, academic articles play a greater role in future research by providing easier, more accessible search criteria, and also by allowing researchers to it easier for future research and experiments being conducted on the same material. The article “A Donut for Your Diet? The Truth about Trans Fat,” is a completely different case, as we see humor and a question before even learning what the article is about. Right away, the title catches the normal person’s attention with an absurd proposal, having a
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Cornett during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Fact or Fiction - 1 Patrick Angle English 101 9-6-07 Fact...

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