STUDENT iCivics Propaganda Whats the Message.pdf - What’s...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

What’s the Message?Name:Reading p.1PropagandaDid you know the average teen is exposed to over 3,000 advertisementsper day? Without the skills to look critically at all these messages, it’seasy to be persuaded by them without even realizing it.Propagandaismedia that uses carefully-crafted messages to manipulate people’sactions and beliefs. It has one purpose, and one purpose only: topersuade you. There are a variety of propaganda techniques. They usebiased, or one-sided, messages and are designed to appeal to peoples’emotions instead of their judgment and reasoning. How many of thefollowing techniques do you recognize from your own exposure topropaganda?Bandwagon“Jumping on the bandwagon” describes people choosing to goalong with the rest of the crowd.Bandwagonpropagandacreates the impression that there is widespread support for a thingor idea. People tend to want to be on the winning team and try toavoid being the odd one out. These messages create a sense ofpeer pressure to join in.Ask yourself: Does the message provide reasons for joining thegroup? Is there any evidence for or against joining in?Name-CallingName-callingis exactly what it sounds like: using negative wordsand bad names to create fear and dislike for people, ideas, orinstitutions. Name-calling can be verbal or visual. When donevisually, it shows a person or thing in an unflattering way. You canfind both kinds of this technique in political cartoons, politicalattack ads, and on news talk shows.Ask yourself: Who is being called what? Is there a real connectionbetween the names and the person/idea being attacked?A 2008 political cartoon showing thepresidential candidates too young or too old.TestimonialsTestimonialsusually involve celebrities or other respected peopleendorsing, or officially supporting, a product or idea. The persongiving the testimonial could be famous, knowledgeable about theproduct (such as a doctor talking about medicine), or just an ordinaryperson who claims the product has worked for them. When thetestimonial comes from a celebrity, the hope is that you will want touse the product or support the idea simply because they do. Othertestimonials try to persuade you to use or support something becauseit is good for you or it worked for others. Beware, though, becausepeople are usually paid to give endorsements (except in politics).Ask yourself: Who is quoted in the testimonial? Is this person actuallyan expert about this product or idea? Does the product or idea havevalue without the testimony or endorsement?Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama in2008.It must be good if billions have beenserved!
Glittering Generalities
Reading p.2

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 8 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Summer
Professor
N/A

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture