Sec V B SE 650.pdf - 2007 SECTION V ARTICLE 29 SE-650...

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2007 SECTION V ARTICLE 29, SE-650 ARTICLE 29 ACOUSTIC EMISSION STANDARDS STANDARD GUIDE FOR MOUNTING PIEZOELECTRIC ACOUSTIC EMISSION SENSORS SE-650 (Identical with ASTM Specification E 650-97) 1. Scope 1.1 This document provides guidelines for mounting piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensors. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 2. Referenced Documents 2.1 ASTM Standards: E 976 Guide for Determining the Reproducibility of Acous- tic Emission Sensor Response E 1316 Terminology for Nondestructive Examinations 3. Terminology 3.1 Definitions of Terms Specific to This Standard: 3.1.1 bonding agent — a couplant that physically atta- ches the sensor to the structure. 3.1.2 couplant — a material used at the structure-to- sensor interface to improve the transfer of acoustic energy across the interface. 3.1.3 mounting fixture — a device that holds the sen- sor in place on the structure to be monitored. 3.1.4 sensor — a detection device that transforms the particle motion produced by an elastic wave into an electrical signal. 533 3.1.5 waveguide, acoustic — a device that couples acoustic energy from a structure to a remotely mounted sensor. For example, a solid wire or rod, coupled to a sensor at one end and to the structure at the other. 3.2 Definitions: 3.2.1 For definitions of additional terms relating to acoustic emission, refer to Terminology E 1316. 4. Significance and Use 4.1 The methods and procedures used in mounting AE sensors can have significant effects upon the performance of those sensors. Optimum and reproducible detection of AE requires both appropriate sensor-mounting fixtures and consistent sensor-mounting procedures. 5. Mounting Methods 5.1 The purpose of the mounting method is to hold the sensor in a fixed position on a structure and to ensure that the acoustic coupling between the sensor and the structure is both adequate and constant. Mounting methods will generally fall into one of the following categories: 5.1.1 Compression Mounts — The compression mount holds the sensor in intimate contact with the surface of the structure through the use of force. This force is generally supplied by springs, torqued-screw threads, mag- nets, tape, or elastic bands. The use of a couplant is strongly advised with a compression mount to maximize the trans- mission of acoustic energy through the sensor-structure interface. Copyright ASME International Provided by IHS under license with ASME Licensee=Simon Carves Limited/5921537001, User=Roy, Mayukh Not for Resale, 11/13/2007 01:09:51 MST No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS
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ARTICLE 29, SE-650 2007 SECTION V 5.1.2 Bonding —
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  • Fall '16
  • Heri
  • Signal Processing, ASME, ASME International, Acoustic signature, couplant

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