Chp2_MixDilute

Chp2_MixDilute - Mixing and Dilution Consider an initial...

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Mixing and Dilution Consider an initial solution with molar concentration, C i , and volume, V i . Note that the number of mols of solute is thereby: C i × V i = n i . To this solution, let us imagine adding a volume, V 2 , of a second (of the same type) characterized by a concentration, C 2 . Again, note the number of moles added to the original solution is n 2 = C 2 × V 2 . The resulting, “final”, solution, will have a concentration, C f and volume, V f . The basic rule is that the final concentration of any solution formed by mixing two (or more) solutions is: “the total amount of solute divided by the total amount of solvent/solution.” The solvent/solution distinction depends on the particular concentration unit. For molarity, the denominator would be the total volume of solution. Thus, we may write: 2 2 2 2 2 V V V C V C V V n n C i i i i i f + + = + + = This expression is explicit for mixing two solutions. More generally for the case of mixing “N”
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Chp2_MixDilute - Mixing and Dilution Consider an initial...

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