APCO 1P00 - Week 7 Lecture Slides

APCO 1P00 - Week 7 Lecture Slides - Week 7 Design Debugging...

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    Week 7 Design, Debugging, Files, and  an intro to HTML (Chapters 9, some of 10, 11)
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    Design Methodologies We have two primary options when it comes to designing a new program. Option 1 is called bottom-up design (this one works, yet it is not the method of choice in most cases) Option 2 is called top-down design. This is the one we will typically utilize.
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    Bottom-up Design In this design, we start with some idea of what we want to accomplish. We call this the “problem statement”. Next, we try to find something that we can already do that either a) is similar in concept to our problem; or b) is a solution to a portion of our problem. From here, we begin to build upwards towards a final complete solution to the problem statement.
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    The easiest way to visualize this concept, is with a non programming example: 1) A novelist gets an idea for a new book. 2) They know how they want the stories climax to play out, so they write that chapter first. 3) Next, there are a couple of characters they had conceived of, in other things they have written (maybe never even published). They flesh those out and add them in. 4) Slowly, they add more and more pieces to the story, gradually building towards a finished work. 5) All the time, they edit and re-read to make sure it still follows the path towards the ultimate objective.
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    Next, we will view it from a programming perspective: 1) A programmer is hired, and given a problem to solve. 2) They know how to write the code for one portion of the total solution; so they enter it in to the computer. 3) Next, there are a couple of methods that they have written for other programs, that they know would help for this project. They modify them accordingly, and add them in to the program. 4) Slowly, they add more and more methods to the program, gradually building towards a finished work. 5) All the time, they debug and re-evaluate to make sure it still follows the path towards the ultimate objective.
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    Essentially, we start with a seed, and grow it in to a final solution to our problem statement. Because this process tends to be a bit haphazard, we will need to test our program frequently! This is to ensure that the pieces we add on, don’t have negative interactions with the pieces already in place. A positive to this design methodology though, is that it is often easier to modify an existing piece of code, than to try and find a brand new solution. Eg: Creating a ghost image through image blending. Because we already knew how to blend sounds together, it was an easier step to blend images!
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    Top-down Design This is the design methodology typically recommended by most engineering disciplines. In this, we begin with a large problem (typically a list of
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course APCO 1P00 taught by Professor Radue during the Spring '08 term at Brock University.

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APCO 1P00 - Week 7 Lecture Slides - Week 7 Design Debugging...

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