APCO 1P00 - Week 9 Lecture Slides

APCO 1P00 - Week 9 Lecture Slides - Week 9 Animation and...

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  1 Week 9 Animation and JavaScript
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  2 Animation Chapter 12
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  3 What is animation? Animation is the process of generating motion through a series of still images. In computer terms, an animation (or movie) is an array of pictures. These pictures are displayed one after the other, at a speed sufficient to make them appear as one continuous motion.
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  4 If we see related images one after the other fast enough, the eye retains the images; enabling us to see them as continuous movement. The reason this all works, is because of a feature of our visual system called “persistence of vision” The number of frames displayed per second is the “frame rate” of the movie. Typically, a frame rate of 16 frames per second (fps) is considered fast enough for persistence of vision to work. Today’s motion pictures are generally filmed at 24 fps for smooth images, and to fit the sound track on as well.
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  5 Working with movies Movies are very difficult to work with for a number of reasons. A primary one, is simply the sheer volume of data you are required to work with. For instance, with a 640x480 screen size, at 24 fps, we have 640 * 480 * 24 = 7,372,800 pixels per second! With 3 bytes for a colour, and a 90min movie (5400 seconds), we have 7372800 * 3 * 5400 = 119,439,360,000 bytes of data! This is well over 100 gigabytes!
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  6 Because of the enormous space required, digital movies are nearly always compressed (even a DVD is compressed – as a DVD holds less than 7 gigabytes). One method of compression, would be to save key frames in the movie, and then record the differences between one frame and the next. A common video format on computer, is MPEG. All this is, is a series of MPEG images, merged with an MPEG audio file (such as MP3) In this course, we won’t be looking at the audio/video merge. Rather, we will just look at the arrays of pictures.
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  7 Making a movie with JES To create a movie, we are going to need to create a series of images. JES also has a built in program that allows you to take a collection of images (saved as .jpg files), and put them in to one JPEG movie. There are many free utilities available online to do this as well. From our end, we just need to make a picture, and then write it to disk. If we do this enough times (with slight differences between the images), we have what we need to make a movie!
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  8 The steps to create a series of images 1. Start with your first picture 2. Write it to disk 3. Make a modification to the picture 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you reach your final image Clearly, loops will be handy for this!
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  9
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  10 frame000.jpg frame015.jpg frame030.jpg frame060.jpg frame075.jpg frame090.jpg
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course APCO 1P00 taught by Professor Radue during the Spring '08 term at Brock University, Canada.

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APCO 1P00 - Week 9 Lecture Slides - Week 9 Animation and...

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