Hist 140C Final - 1 Lisek Michael Lisek History 140C Professor Corey TA Bernard 21 March 2019 Final PART A Your 19-year-old cousin who flunked out

Hist 140C Final - 1 Lisek Michael Lisek History 140C...

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1LisekMichael LisekHistory 140CProfessor Corey; TA Bernard21 March 2019FinalPART A Your 19-year-old cousin who flunked out of high school has decided to enlist in the Armed Forces. While you respect his desire to serve his country, his history of bad decision-making worries you. Does he know what it means to fight in a war? Has he thought this through? You have just read THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE for this class and you think it might be a good thing for him to read it before he shows up for his physical. Write the letter you would sendto your cousin describing this book, its impact on you, and an explanation of why he needs to read it. Dear Mark,I know it’s been a long time since we last wrote to each other but I’m concerned about your impetuous, hasty decision to enter the Armed Forces. I realize school was never your strongest suit and you dreamt of a life filled with adventure. However, after recently reading the book, “Thank You for Your Service”, I strongly urge you to hear the bleak truth about what it means to fight in war. Although I admire your courage to serve our country, I believe your naivety undermines the potential ramifications both physically and psychologically that can result from this decision. “Thank You for Your Service” highlights the aftermath of war as men return from Iraq attempting to pick up semblances of their former lives as they face debilitations in mental health, anxiety, financial disarray, and even battle injuries. Mark, I implore you to read this book as it has shown me the invisible side of war as soldiers struggle to reenter civilian life, and I urge you to see these potential, tragic effects such as unhappiness and depression you and your loved ones may encounter in the future
2LisekI believe you would empathize with the main protagonist Adam Schumann the most. Following his final deployment from Iraq two years later, Adam resides at his home in Kansas and eventually it becomes aware to the reader that Adam confided to his wife Saskia the thoughtsof suicide and stress he feels. The advanced stages of anxiety and even the post-traumatic stress Adam harbors signal a reoccurring theme in the book. The author, David Finkel, demonstrates soldiers are reluctant to share their burdens and mental health issues (Finkel, 60). Mark, if Adam is any example of mental health shaming, soldiers in particular fear disclosing their mental state for the fear of mockery and appeared feminization. You need to reflect why you wish to join the Armed Forces, I think the idea of fighting for your country gives you a sense of pride and bravado. However, when you read this book those feelings are fleeting as in Adam’s case where his wife continuously has to count his sleeping pills to make sure he didn’t take too many or check their guns to ensure one’s not missing (Finkel, 50). I hope you would never want this kind of strain on your familial relationships as you attempt to convince yourself everything is fine even when you yourself might be suffering from thoughts of suicide or worse. The male pride

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