C489 Task 3 Mueller.docx - Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Task 3 SAT1-0517\/1217 Scott Mueller Western Governors University ORGANIZATIONAL

C489 Task 3 Mueller.docx - Organizational Systems and...

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Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Task 3, SAT1-0517/1217 Scott Mueller Western Governors University
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ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS TASK 3 2 A1. Country to Compare After looking at the healthcare systems of Japan, Switzerland, Germany, and Great Britain, I chose to compare Japan to the healthcare system present in the United States. Japan has had a universal health insurance program in place since 1961, which has led to great successes-- i.e.: the world's highest life expectancy-- and also some downsides to include increased health- care expenditure and a decline in accountability for care (Sakamoto et al., 2018). The system is regulated by the government and is called the Statutory Health Insurance System (SHIS), which is made up of more than 3,400 insurers and gives Japanese citizens universal primary coverage. Citizens must enroll in coverage, with varying premiums depending on age and socioeconomic status. Coinsurance is then 30% for all services. Private health insurance is also available which serves to provide a supplement to life insurance, aiding those who are hospitalized with chronic diseases like cancer, with additional income. (Matsuda, n.d.). In comparison, there is no universal healthcare system in place in the United States. Here it a mix of publicly and privately- funded systems, with the majority of American's holding private insurance provided by their employers. The Affordable Care Act was passed in 2010 in order to bring health insurance to more Americans by mandating coverage. A2. Access In the United States, children are either covered under their parent's private insurance, Medicaid, or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Medicaid is partially funded by both the federal government and by individual states, and as of 2015, Medicaid provided coverage for 70.5 million children and adults (Tunstall, n.d.). The CHIP program provides coverage for children coming from families whose income is "...between 200 percent and 300 percent of the federal poverty level" (Tunstall, n.d.). Children in Japan are covered by the
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ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS TASK 3 3 universal healthcare system. However, as of 2015 13.9% of children were living below the
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