BIA FINAL PAPER - INTEREST GROUPS IN LIBERIA ANGIE SKARP...

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INTEREST GROUPS IN LIBERIA ANGIE SKARP POLITICAL SCIENCE 238 DECEMBER 6, 2018
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A long history From America to West Africa In the early 1800’s, a group called the American Colonization Society was formed with the idea that the black slaves should be placed back where they came from (Anjali M.,Duva,PBS ). They felt that blacks and former slaves would have a better chance at freedom in Africa, rather than the United States, although that wasn’t their only intention. They also intended on spreading Christianity among Africa, and slaveholders saw it as a way to avoid slave rebellions that were bound to occur. They were able to acquire some blacks who were willing to emigrate from the United States, and they would be controlled by those who run the ACS. A major issue in this logic, is that these blacks were culturized, and now being placed where the indigenous people have already established. Now as we can imagine, this was a situation in which many conflicts could easily occur. They had suffered from various diseases, and violence against the natives, but they were persistent in their suit to prove they could successfully develop their own country. The ACS continued to govern these settlers, and the settlement was eventually named Monrovia, after U.S president, James Monroe. Fast forward The settlers had copied the image of the United States in the sense of constructing church buildings, schools, agriculture, and trading, but as they pursued to expand, they were losing economic support greatly and could not maintain their power of the indigenous people of these lands. The ACS then withdrew their support, furthermore dwindling their economy(Anjali
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M.,Duva, PBS ). These economic issues only deepened the resentment from the indigenous people as the settlers looked to become even more like the United states. The political climate during this time was very tense-- as many saw it as a clear political dominance from the U.S settlers. This separation that was occuring between the indigenous people and settlers would set the mood for the future growth of this struggling country. Violence Tensions rise Liberia faced a serious struggle of who was to gain power of the country. A group called the People’s Redemption Council was a group who had aspirations to overthrow the current president, Doe (Anjali M.,Duva, PBS ). Under his administration, many ethnic groups such as the Gio (or Dan) and the Mano started to engage in violence, when they used to be otherwise peaceful. Charles taylor was a man with the goal of overturning the government and led a rebel group to do so. In September of 1990, Doe was captured and tortured to death, meanwhile villages were emptied and would become of the world’s biggest “ethnic cleansing” (Anjali M.,Duva, PBS ). During that civil war, the Economic Community of West African States attempted to dismantle Charles Taylor and his power, in hopes to decrease the violence and separation in the country. Taylor was able to eventually gain presidency, to which many hoped he would decrease the violence. This shows the amount of separation in this country, as the people
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  • The Land, Liberia, First Liberian Civil War, History of Liberia

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