AUCW antigone

AUCW antigone - Kelly Guinan AUCW 180 Antigone Febraury 21,...

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Kelly Guinan AUCW 180 Antigone Febraury 21, 2008 1. Creon’s motivation for forbidding the burial of his own nephew was a reaction to the civil war stirred by Polyneices as he fought to slay his brother Eteocles in his own city of Thebes. The two brothers originally ruled the city in unison, a pair of heirs to the throne in the line of Oedipus, yet their quarelling resulted in the expulsion of Polyneices from the land. Returning with an army of his own to take his city into his own hands to rule, Polyneices fought his own brother and the two died in combat against eachother. Creon buried Eteocles with full military honor, but left the corpse of Polyneices to rot, an especially terrible edict because it raped him of any honor and, as it was believed at the time, stole any authority from the gods to take the dead into their own land. Creon made this rash decision because he felt as a new ruler, he needed to prove his loyalty to the state and put any emotional family ties aside. He had to prove himself to gain the
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course AUCW 180 taught by Professor Martinelli during the Spring '08 term at Hartford.

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