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Accepted Manuscript Integrating particle physical geometry into composting degradation kinetics Yongjiang Wang, Ping Ai PII: S0960-8524(15)01476-5 DOI: Reference: BITE 15698 To appear in: Bioresource Technology Received Date: 31 August 2015 Revised Date: 19 October 2015 Accepted Date: 20 October 2015 Please cite this article as: Wang, Y., Ai, P., Integrating particle physical geometry into composting degradation kinetics, Bioresource Technology (2015), doi: This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
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1 Integrating particle physical geometry into composting degradation kinetics Yongjiang Wang *† , Ping Ai * * Huazhong Agricultural University, College of Engineering, 1 Shi-zi-shan Street, 430070, Wuhan, China Corresponding author. Tel.: +86 131 2501 3679. Email address: [email protected] Abstract: The study was carried out to integrate physical geometry of compost particle with degradation kinetics to model biological reactions, which revealing additional dynamic approaches. A sphere and its circumscribing cube were used to represent compost particles. An inner sphere, representing anaerobic zone, was introduced to describe variations of substrate volume without sufficient oxygen supply. Degradation of soluble substrates and hydrolysis of insoluble substrates were associated with the particle geometry. Transportation of soluble substrates produced from hydrolysis was expressed using Fick’s law. Through the integration of degradation kinetics with geometry models, degradation models could describe varying volume of composting materials involving aerobic or anaerobic digestion and transportation of soluble substrates in a unit compost particle. Keywords: Composting; Particle geometry; Solubility; Kinetics
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2 1 Introduction Composting is a practical treatment method for various organic wastes such as manure and straws (Talib et al., 2014; Zhang & Sun, 2014; Zhou et al., 2014). These wastes can be converted through composting to form stabilized fertilizer or soil supplement, which is beneficial to plant growth and helps alleviate environmental pressure. Substrate degradation produces heat, carbon dioxide, and water while consuming oxygen, which is one of the main components driving the composting process (Lin et al., 2008; Talib et al., 2014; Tognetti et al., 2008; Woodford, 2009; Zhou et al., 2014). Substrate degradation is a rather complex process that involves heterogeneous substrate variations and diverse groups of microorganisms coupled with physical and biochemical reactions, which makes the process hard to understand.
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  • Summer '16
  • erick yanza
  • Composting, Haug

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