Noelle Dissler final.docx - Noelle Dissler HIS 200 Applied History Southern New Hampshire University Dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Noelle Dissler final.docx - Noelle Dissler HIS 200 Applied...

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Noelle DisslerHIS 200: Applied HistorySouthern New Hampshire UniversityDropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan is significant because this lead to the end of WWII. The Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor Making the decision to drop the atomic bomb much easier. Especially because all of the information about the atomic blast and its affects were not disclosed to the military and Harry Truman, who were the final decision makers. Thus a bomb (little boy) was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. The Japanese refused to surrender so there was a second larger bomb (fat man) dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. A few days later the Japanese surrendered and Americans won WWII. What was the impact on plant life in Hiroshima, Japan 5 years after the atomic bomb was dropped? The attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, sprung a divided nation into action. President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a joint session of the 77thUnited States Congress the day after the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. This is what sparked the declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Winston Churchill was Roosevelt’s closest friend during the war. Shortly after the United States joined the war, Churchill expressed “we have won the war.” Meanwhile in Japan, December 8thwas the day Japan declared war on the United States as well as the British Empire. They prepared their citizens for war simply by placing propaganda posters around. Saburō Kurusu, former Japanese ambassador to the United States, gave an address in which he talked about the "historical inevitability of the war of Greater East Asia." He said war had been a response to Washington's longstanding aggression toward Japan. Eventually Germany and Italy declare war on the United States, other countries followed suit, thus beginning WWII.
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Many lives were lost on August 6, 1945, estimated 250,000, the effects are still lasting. The number of people with leukemia and other health issues has risen since that fateful day.
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