EED 101.pdf - ENGLISH FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT(EED LAW EED(LAW 101 2019 SEMESTER 1 TERM 1 \u201cThe most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is

EED 101.pdf - ENGLISH FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT(EED LAW...

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Unformatted text preview: ENGLISH FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (EED) LAW EED (LAW) 101 2019 SEMESTER 1 TERM 1 “The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed” Steven Bantu Biko. 1 Contents page no: General Information (Letter to Students) 2 Essential Information 3 Lecture Groups, times and venues 3 What is the student’s role and responsibility in the course? 10 How are students evaluated? 11 Guidelines for tutor consultation 28 Term 1 Schedule 29 Term 1 Essay Questions 30 Materials/Texts 32 2 GENERAL INFORMATION Letter to students Dear students The University of the Western Cape (UWC) describes itself as an ‘engaged university’ that is committed to addressing ‘the complex challenges of the modern world’. It has a number of past identities or reputations which affect how we see it today. These include ‘bush college’, ‘struggle university’, ‘historically black institution’, ‘historically disadvantaged institution’, ‘home of the left’. You may have been aware of some or all of these identities, and some or all of them may have influenced your decision to study here. UWC seeks to be sensitive and responsive to its history and goals in South Africa, Africa and the international community. In part this means that the university is aware that many of its students come from socially and economically deprived backgrounds. At the same time, it must develop the abilities and talents of its students and staff so that they can take their places in a global and competitive environment. One of the ways it seeks to achieve this is by being a ‘people-friendly’ university, and by acknowledging that we are ‘a society in transition’ that operates in a contradictory environment. For instance, internationally and nationally many ‘high level jobs’ actually reduce the number of jobs available, while our country seeks to grow by increasing the number of jobs. Commitment to ‘quality, excellence and development’ is another means of reaching this goal because it ‘brings about sustained and beneficial change’. So what is your role as a student in all this? As an individual you need to commit yourself wholeheartedly to your own educational progress. You do this by taking ownership of the structures that have been set up for you. Your contributions in lectures and tutorials will enhance the learning of others. Your attentiveness and responses to the material and to the group processes you are involved in, could make or break your future or those of your fellow students. Without your full engagement, the experience of this course will be mediocre, for yourself and those around you. Consider that YOU can make a difference and try it out! Please keep all of these ideas and principles in mind because they form the background to your success at UWC and in this course. Wishing you all the best for 2019, Mahmoud Patel Overall Coordinator EED Programme Coordinator and Lecturer EED (Law) Office: D 236 (021) 959 2090 [email protected] 3 Essential information Welcome to EED (Law) 101 – the academic development course specifically for Law students at UWC. This is a well-established course, but we are continually revising it to meet new needs and to develop fresh challenges. EED (Law) 101 is a year course comprising of four terms and two semesters. Please note that this course is for Law students but that the EED Programme, NOT the Faculty of Law, administers it. If you encounter problems with tutorials or lectures, please come to the EED Programme currently located in the Department of English, not the Faculty of Law. However, there are two important exceptions: 1. If you know in advance that you cannot write an EED (Law) 101 examination/test because, for instance, there is a clash in your examination timetable; you must contact the EED Programme and the Faculty of Law as soon as possible. 2. You could not write the examination/test because, for instance, you were sick or involved in an accident; you must obtain the necessary forms from the Faculty of Law, and then bring them to Mr T Galvin the EED administrator in D232, within five working days of the day of the examination/test that you missed, and you must provide proof to support your claim. Lectures and tutorials There will be no tutorial in the first week of the first (semester 1) and third terms (semester 2). Apart from that, and unless there is a public holiday or for some other reason University teaching does not take place, there will be two lectures and one tutorial per week. In the lectures your lecturer will do most of the ‘talking’, but in a manner that encourages interaction with the lecturer. Professional tutors and/ or lecturers conduct tutorials in close consultation with the course coordinator. In the tutorials you do most of the talking/writing and the tutor facilitates discussion. In lectures and tutorials you should be thinking and listening all the time. Students are divided into lecture groups. We start the year with three lecture groups for full time registered students. Lecture times and venues: Lecture group number Gp 1 (full time) Gp 2 (full time) Gp 3 (full time) Day and period Mon, p 2 Thurs, p 2 Mon, p 3 Thurs, p 1 Mon, p 5 Thurs, p 5 Time Venue 9:40 – 10:40 9:40 – 10:40 10:50 – 11:50 8:30 – 9:30 13:10 – 14:10 10:50 – 11:50 GH 2 GH 2 B1 B1 N7 N7 4 Your lecture and tutorial times and venues should be in your registration details. For tutorials please consult the EED (Law) notice-board in the DL block. If your tutorial times and venues are not there or there are clashes, consult Mr T Galvin, the EED Programme Administrator in D232.You must stick with the lecture and tutorial group for the whole year to which you have been allocated. Do not ‘shop around’. If you do this, it is possible that some of your marks may not be allocated to you. You may only change lecture or tutorial groups if you have received permission from Mr Galvin, and the course coordinator. Do not bring your query directly to a lecturer!!! Follow the proper procedure!!! Lectures and tutorial attendance is compulsory. In the event of unannounced ‘spot tests’ in lectures; those who do not write the tests will receive 0%, and may not be eligible for a rewrite. Please ensure that you attend tutorials, otherwise you may fall behind. Part of your coursework mark is on tutorials. You will see your tutor at least once per week for your tutorial, and at least once per term for consultation on essays and tutorial work, during official consultation times and appointments. There are at least five ways in which information about the course is disseminated. 1. Information given out in lectures 2. EED (Law) notice board in the DL block 3. EED (Law) virtual notice board – the university’s e-tool system, Ikamva 4. Information distributed by tutors. 5. Information distributed by class rep/s Please pay attention to information given out, and make a note of it. Consult the DL block EED(Law) notice board and virtual notice board(Ikamva) regularly, because you will find information about important issues such as: times and venues of tests, sick tests and exams, names of students eligible for supplementary/re-evaluation exams; lists of students eligible for certain tests; changes to the course timetable, marks; information about tutorials and tutors; reading material/lists for parts of the course. Please do not only rely on ecommunication, this means that you must check the subject notice board in the DL block, and what is communicated during lectures. If unsure communicate with the module coordinator. Tutorials and administration At the start of the first term and second terms there may be some administrative problems if, for instance: a) your registration printout details have clash groups, and b) you give incorrect information without furnishing your printout, we then need to open new tutorial groups or close down some. This means that courses, students, coordinators and tutors may have to make several adjustments to their timetables to accommodate various competing changes/demands. Your registration printout may allocate you to a tutorial 5 group, but it is possible that this will change. Please consult the EED (Law) notice board regularly to find out if there has been any change and pay attention in lectures when announcements are made. As a first year student you may find this confusing, because you may encounter several different tutorial groups and tutors in the first few weeks. This is an inevitable consequence of the adjustments we need to make at the start of the year. Please ensure that you attend a tutorial every week, and that you know when and where your tutorial takes place. Consultation times for lecturers and tutors Consultation times enable you to explore problems and/or to obtain more clarity. For instance, you may want to talk and discuss about your essay, or a test, or the exams. Alternately, your tutor may want to see you if she feels that you should address a particular problem in your essay, or if you have not been attending tutorials. If this happens, please meet with her. Generally, students who use the consultation times do better than those who do not. The lecturer/s and tutors are available for consultation at fixed times in their offices. You must ask your tutor for her consultation times and venues. Your tutor must tell you when and where she is available for consultation, and she must put up a notice about this on her office door, and on the EED (Law) notice board. Please contact the course coordinator if your tutor does not provide you with this information. Please use consultation times throughout the year. Do not wait until the day before a major assignment or the day before a test or the final examination. You must visit your tutor for at least one consultation session per term. If you do not do so, marks may be deducted from your course work mark. EED (Law) 101 Portfolio Your portfolio will consist of all tasks you have done during the course. Portfolios will be done online. You will receive orientation and assistance from Centre for Innovative Education and Communication Technologies (CIECT). The primary purpose of the portfolio is to afford you the opportunity to: 1. Take a second look at work you have done and think about how you can improve future work; and 2. Communicate with your tutor in ways that school probably did not provide for. 3. Take ownership/responsibility of your development in the course. 4. Develop professional approaches to your learning and development. 5. As a future legal professional you must develop discipline and professionalism. 6. Develop and improve your work through the use of technology. 6 It is expected that, as you engage with each portfolio-related task, you will begin to develop the critical ability to self-reflect, self-evaluate and engage in self-directed learning which is the basis of university learning. Portfolio material includes all essays, tasks from the Lecturer and tutorials as well as additional materials accumulated in the course. Details and guidelines are provided by the Lecturer and/or tutor as you will be expected to regularly ensure that your portfolio is up to date, before the final submission and deadline. You will receive eportfolio training in term 2, during your tutorial slot, facilitated by CIECT staff at a designated elab Attendance is compulsory for the eportfolio training. What is the purpose of this course? At UWC most faculties have language and academic literacy courses that prepare students for the specific demands of their courses and professions. Many professions and disciplines have particular language and academic literacy requirements. EED (Law) is specifically for Law students. It seeks to enhance and enrich the Law students’ understanding and use of the English language in a legal setting so that they can adjust to the language and academic literacy demands of the university environment and to the requirements of their chosen profession. Given our country’s history of inequality and disadvantage, we acknowledge that students arrive at UWC with different levels of competence, that they cannot fix all language and academic literacy problems in one year, and that they will confront different challenges along the way. Nevertheless, by the end of this course students should be able to write, speak, interpret and debate in the following ways: They should be able to meet the requirements of the question, and produce wellstructured responses to essay topics. They should be interested in and sensitive to the effect and meaning of words because legal practitioners work with words and words carry the law. They should be able to interpret factual knowledge critically and logically They should be able to construct an argument and argue coherently and persuasively. They should be able to recognise different types of arguments, and to distinguish between stronger and weaker forms of argument. They should be able to unite their own research with arguments and wellmotivated personal opinion. They should be able to use concepts accurately and consistently They should be striving to attain the best of their personal and professional ability to produce written and spoken work with as few errors as possible in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. These professional and personal qualities and skills are vital for success at university and in the market place where there is increasing competition for employment. Students who make a full commitment to the course will find that it makes a positive contribution to their academic, professional and personal development. 7 In addition, your interest in language matters should not end with this course. Throughout your academic and professional life you should seek to improve the ways in which you understand and use English. Do I qualify for an exemption from EED (Law) 101? The general rule is that EED (Law) 101 is compulsory for all Law students. However, we recognise that the English competency, and essay-writing abilities of some first-year Law students are fairly advanced, and that the course is unnecessary for them. We are able to exempt some students in one or two ways. If you are exempted, we cannot prevent you from registering for the course. If you think that you fit into any of the categories below, you should apply for exemption. To apply for exemption, contact the module coordinator with all supporting documentation concerning module exemption to D236 or the EED Administrator currently located in office D232 (Department of English, New Arts Block). Remember to bring the necessary documentation (See below for more details). We aim to complete the exemption assessment before the final date for EED (Law) 101 registration. General conditions for exemption from EED (Law) 101 You must be at least 23 years old and in your first registration of the LLB degree, and you must have spent some time in the world outside school (eg working or at a tertiary institution) before coming to this university. A student can only be exempted if the university is satisfied that she has already reached the level of proficiency of someone who has passed the course. In other words, the university must be satisfied that without having completed and passed EED (Law), you already have the abilities that we expect of someone who has completed and passed the course. Documentation required You must also provide certified copies of your results and a comprehensive description of the course that you have passed. You can find that description in the official university or college calendar, faculty handbook or syllabus description for the year in which you passed the course. Make sure that the year of the handbook and the year in which you passed the course are the same. Recognition of tertiary institution You must first find out whether UWC recognises the institution at which you obtained your qualification(s), whether UWC regards its qualifications as equivalent to those obtained at UWC. If UWC does not recognise the institution, then you will have to complete the EED (Law) 101 course. Please note that there is a difference between recognising an institution and recognising a qualification. UWC might recognise an institution, but not recognise its qualification as the equivalent of EED (Law) 101. 8 Types of exemption There are two types of exemption: 1. Exemption with credit: this means that you do not have to complete EED (Law) 101, and that you receive a credit or credits based on the course or courses that you have already completed. If these are not English courses, you will need to show that their course outcomes are sufficiently similar to EED (Law) 101. 2. Exemption without credit: this means that you do not have to complete EED (Law) 101, but you do not receive any credits, and you must complete another course or courses to obtain the credits you would have obtained if you had completed and passed EED (Law) 101. When you choose another course or courses, please ensure that your replacement courses meet the same academic objectives and have the same credit value. In several of these cases we may require you to write an extra test in the first term. If you write the exemption test you must achieve a final mark of at least 65%. Below are some of the conditions under which you may be able to obtain exemption. Exemption with credit You have completed and passed a course at UWC or another university or college. UWC recognises the university and the course as the complete equivalent of EED (Law) 101. You must provide comprehensive details of the course you have passed (see above). In this case you may not need to write an exemption test. You have completed and passed a course at a tertiary institution that UWC recognises, but it regards that course as the partial equivalent of EED (Law) 101. In this case, if you want to apply for exemption you will have to write an exemption test in the first term. The combination of the marks for the course completed and your exemption test results will decide if you can be exempted. You have completed and passed courses at UWC or another university that UWC recognises. These courses are not language and academic development courses. Nevertheless, you feel that through them you have acquired sufficient essay-writing experience and competency in English to be exempted from EED (Law) 101. In this case it may be possible to treat a course or courses as the complete equivalent of EED (Law) 101, but then you might not be able to use those courses to make up your ‘non-legal’ subjects. Again, you might be required to write an exemption test. Exemption without credit You have obtained very good marks in English through an educational system that is generally recognised as more demanding than the SA one. Again, if you want to apply for exemption from EED (Law) 101 you may have to write an exemption test. You have been accepted through the RPL process, and have a portfolio of pieces. Again, if you want to apply for exemption from EED (Law) 101 you will 9 have to write an extra test in the first term. The combination of your portfolio, course marks and test results may be used to decide if you can be exempted. Marking criteria for scripts of those students applying for exemption The marking criteria used for the exemption test are the ones that we use for EED (Law) 101 essays, tests and exams throughout the year. This means that the standards that we apply to EED (Law) 101 assignments, essays, tests, portfolio and exams and the exemption test are identical. When we mark your work we will pay particular attention to: Whether you have answered the questions correctly The structure of your essay (introduction, body, conclusion) Whether you use concepts accurately and consistently. Whether you express your own opinion Whether you use the correct register1 Whether language usage (sentence construction, grammar, spelling, and punctuation) is correct. What books or resources will I need? There is no sing...
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