proportions

proportions - Relative Proportions; Conversion Factors;...

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Relative Proportions; Conversion Factors; Ratios and Factor-Label Method In chemistry, one is often given (or seeks) information that provides relative proportions between one substance and other. Examples include: 1. Molecular formula: e.g. C 6 H 12 O 6 (glucose) provides the relative proportions between the constituent elements and the molecule as a whole; 2. Balanced reactions: C 3 H 8 + 5O 2 → 3CO 2 + 4H 2 O the coefficients give the relative proportions of the various reactants and products; 3. Molar masses (86 g/mol); concentrations (1.25 mols/L); etc., that is, any quantity expressed as a ratio or, equivalently, as the relative proportions of mass to # mols or mols to volume of solution. In other words, relative proportions = ratios = conversion factors. To illustrate, consider each case above: 1. The formula can be expressed variously as: 6C atoms/12 H atoms or 6 O atoms/1 molecule of glucose. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course CH 201 taught by Professor Warren during the Fall '07 term at N.C. State.

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proportions - Relative Proportions; Conversion Factors;...

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