ExamII_Q1

ExamII_Q1 - Freedom and The Categorical Imperative Kant's...

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Freedom and The Categorical Imperative Kant's Groundwork of Moral Philosophy explains how one could establish a ground for distinguishing what is morally permissible and what is morally obligatory. Therefore, Kant must show that morality exists in the first place before indulging in defining what is morally permissible and what is not, and what is morally obligatory and what is not. To establish a rational basis for morality, Kant uses the notion of a maxim which is a compact and a precise formulation of a fundamental principle and a general rule of conduct. In his work, he shows how universalization is used to determine if a maxim is morally permissible, and how limiting ourselves from immoral behaviors is derived from freedom of will. Kant illustrates his ideas starting with setting a firm definition of the freedom of good will and derives from his definition how one's free will could be enslaved by foreign actors. Kant then shows his ideas of what is rational and what is not; he shows how rationality is part of moral
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ExamII_Q1 - Freedom and The Categorical Imperative Kant's...

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